I made this recipe just as described, I drizzled olive oil on the veggies before roasting, and seeded the Tomatoes before roasting. I added two jalapeños fresh picked and one fresh picked green chili. I pulled the skins off the tomatoes when they cooled slightly… The flavor is amazing, perhaps a bit too much heat, I will chill overnight and perhaps only add one jalapeño next time.
Use 1-2 jalapeño peppers, depending on how spicy you like your salsa. Make sure you remove the seeds and ribs before dicing the peppers. Cut the jalapeño in half lengthwise, then take a spoon and scrape out the ribs and seeds, working from the bottom to the top of the pepper. Pro tip-wear plastic gloves when working with jalapeños to prevent burning. And never rub your eyes after dicing up a jalapeño, trust me!
Chips and salsa are one of my all-time favorite appetizers and snacks. If I open a bag a chips and start dipping, you can count on that bag of chips being gone by the end of the hour. I have no self control when it comes to snacking on chips and salsa! I want to eat them all and I usually do. My favorite salsa is Pico de Gallo because it is so simple and fresh! You can’t go wrong with this classic salsa.
This is pretty much my exact recipe, only I stopped measuring a long time ago and I’ve never tried using canned tomatoes along with the fresh. Fresh salsa is definitely the way to go. I can’t even eat canned salsa anymore. One thing I do sometimes to add depth is to roast the tomato, garlic, and jalapeno (just throw it all on a baking sheet and let it go for about 20 minutes at 400F, turning once if I’m not feeling too lazy). This in combo with the fresh cilantro and lime juice gets rave reviews. I bet using canned tomatoes would add a similar depth! 

First and foremost, like any salsa, this one is a crowd-pleasing party dip. But that’s just one of the many hats it wears. On nights you don’t feel like cooking (or it’s simply too hot), spoon this hearty salsa into a soft tortilla, top with a dollop of Greek yogurt and guac, and you’ve got a no-muss, no-fuss meal on your hands. Beyond that, spoon it over grilled chicken, fish, or pork chops, or make it the star of your next burrito bowl.
Canned tomatoes are typically picked at their peak ripeness, which means they will be more flavorful and sweet. They are then processed within hours of being harvested to maintain the best flavor. There are different types of canned tomato products, however, diced or whole for salsas will achieve the proper consistency. Fresh tomatoes can be used in combination to add texture, however, they are much more watery since they have not be cooked to release some of the moisture. They are however excellent for chunkier dips like pico de gallo.
I want to share with you my favorite salsa recipe. It has great tomato flavor with the pop of cilantro and just right amount of heat from the serrano chiles. It goes well with chips, carne asada tacos, taquitos, eggs and just about any other dish that you like to add salsa to. You will find a variation of this salsa on tables throughout Mexico. It’s a classic and with good reason.
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More…
@Carl. My wife is Mexican and I’ve traveled there many times; particularly the state of Michoacán where she’s from. In Mexico, the sauce that you make is called a “Salsa Cruda” (Raw Sauce). It is perfectly fine to make it without frying/simmering since it’s just one of the MANY ways to make a sauce in the Mexican kitchen. I must say that adding cumin to a sauce is more typical of Tex Mex than the authentic Mexican style sauce. Also, lime is only added to something such as pico de gallo. Salsa verde is another sauce that made by cooking tomatillos, jalapeños and a couple garlic cloves in slightly boiling water for about 10 min. Once the tomatillos are cooked, you add them with a little bit of the cooking water, the chilies, garlic, a piece of white onion, cilantro and salt to a food processor. This is carefully processed due to the hot liquid. Tomatillos can be pretty acidic so a pinch of sugar can be added to counter that. I’ve been in a ranch in Michoacán where they cooked a goat over a wood fire. I saw them make the “birria” (typical Mexican sauce for roasted meats) over the same wood fire. It picked up the smoke taste and I’ll tell you, it was the best BBQ goat that I EVER had!

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One thing though, I have never heard of simmering it. I switch up making mine to where I add all ingredients into a food processor and process until well mixed and chopped and then serve, or I only place the tomatoes and spices in the food processor and process until well chopped and then add the finely chopped onions, jalapenos and cilantro and then mix manually until all is well mixed. This makes for a chunkier salsa, and again I serve immediately.
I like to keep a big jar of the homemade salsa in my refrigerator for up to a week. I serve the chips and salsa with quick weeknight dinners like quesadillas or tacos, and Keith loves them as a side with his sandwiches at lunch. The kids even dip veggies in the salsa for afternoon snacks. I’m not exaggerating when I say that this is truly a kitchen staple — whether we’re hosting a party or not! 
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