Vamos a cocinarla a fuego medio hasta que se poche y se dore un poco, para lo que iremos removiendo de vez en cuando para que no se nos pegue. Cuando esté blandita la cebolla vamos a echar un poco de pimienta negra recién molida e iremos agregando los cuatro tipos de quesos troceados, para que se vayan fundiendo más fácilmente. Lo hacemos a fuego medio-suave, para que se vayan mezclando poco a poco y no se nos quemen.
Tomatoes are the most important ingredient. The fresher they are the better your salsa will taste. Look for the ripest ones you can find. Getting a good char on the vegetables is another key to developing the flavor. The lime juice brightens and enhances the flavor. The recipe calls for two serrano peppers but only add one if you want to reduce the heat.
This is a fantastic and super simple recipe! I doubled the recipe because I consider salsa to be a food group in and of itself and wanted to have some for a few days. I also doubled the jalapeño as I like more kick. I must disagree with one of the other reviewers in that I found the flavor to be better the second day and still better the day after that! So much so that the next time I make it, I will make it the day before I need it so the flavors can meld overnight.
You may notice that there is no spicy element to this fresh salsa. That’s because I personally can’t handle even a little heat, so I always make mild salsas. Traditionally, you’ll want to use jalapeño or serrano pepper to provide the extra kick of heat salsas are known for, and if spiciness is your thing, feel free to add in some heat as needed! It’s all about making the best pico de gallo recipe for your tastes.
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LOL! I know, no spice here. And you must think I’ve lost it because you know how much I love spice. BUT, I was trying to make this a very family/kid friendly salsa because my whole family loves chips and salsa so much but I’m the only spice fiend. The 4 year old likes some spice, but the others are all spice wussies! It still has loads of flavor, especially with the roasted garlic in there. I love it, although truth be told I often dump my favorite hot sauce over the top. HAHAHA!
Made this today with my remaining garden tomatoes, roasting the tomatoes, garlic, and onions as directed. Within just a few seconds of pulsing in the food processor, the mixture turned to complete soup. I mean, there was just no salvaging a salsa type of consistency out of it. The spices are nice and I’m going to use it to make a cream of tomato soup tomorrow, but wanted to warn others who may be really needing a salsa end product. And maybe you have some tips for ensuring this doesn’t happen?
I made this recipe just as described, I drizzled olive oil on the veggies before roasting, and seeded the Tomatoes before roasting. I added two jalapeños fresh picked and one fresh picked green chili. I pulled the skins off the tomatoes when they cooled slightly… The flavor is amazing, perhaps a bit too much heat, I will chill overnight and perhaps only add one jalapeño next time.
Our gluten free homemade style tortilla corn chips are made from scratch to perfection using our traditional family recipe passed down for generations. Made with all-natural and certified non GMO ingredients from our corn to sunflower oil. Seasoned with our very own sea salt hand-harvested in the deep blue waters of the Sea of Cortez in Mexico, these mouthwatering chips are guilt-free and full of flavor.
Perhaps most of you already know this delicious salsa, but hey! It is spring and grilling season is about to start, at least here in my area; and I find this a good reason to post it. Salsa Mexicana or “ Pico de Gallo Salsa” as it is known in some areas of México, is one of the simplest of Salsas and it can be ready in a matter of minutes to top your grilled chicken, steaks or fish.
Douglas, I was just wondering about using the iron skillet or comal and the tomatoes. I tried a different recipe the other day and used my iron skillet to toast the ancho chilies, tomatoes and serrano peppers it called for. After blending all the ingredients, I used the same skillet to heat and cook the finished sauce. I only thought about it after the fact and wondered if the acidic sauce changed in flavor by using the iron skillet. I am sure our grandmothers used their iron for everything and never worried about the acid in them, so I am sure this question is moot, but I still want to know. I am not a very good cook, even though I try, and last weeks sauce did not turn out very tasty. I am going to give this one a try and hope it comes out better. Thank you for posting this.
This is a fantastic and super simple recipe! I doubled the recipe because I consider salsa to be a food group in and of itself and wanted to have some for a few days. I also doubled the jalapeño as I like more kick. I must disagree with one of the other reviewers in that I found the flavor to be better the second day and still better the day after that! So much so that the next time I make it, I will make it the day before I need it so the flavors can meld overnight.
Made this recipe with my son (10yr old) on a rainy cold Saturday. What a success! Showing him some knife skills, taught him to use a can opener. Told stories. Substituted some of the tomato for a handful of tomatillos so I could teach him to blanch. Finally an hour or so away from technology to just talk with my son. Salsa turned out absolutely incredible btw. Thanks
This is a fantastic and super simple recipe! I doubled the recipe because I consider salsa to be a food group in and of itself and wanted to have some for a few days. I also doubled the jalapeño as I like more kick. I must disagree with one of the other reviewers in that I found the flavor to be better the second day and still better the day after that! So much so that the next time I make it, I will make it the day before I need it so the flavors can meld overnight.
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Cinco de Mayo is this Thursday. You haven’t even prepared for the party you’re attending. You’re supposed to make that thing you said you would. What was it, oh yeah, salsa. Rachel was counting on you. You promised. You scour the internet for a recipe. This one on D.R. Horton’s blog pops up. You think, “How could I mess this up?” It gets made. It’s delicious. You arrive at the party, salsa in hand. You realize you brought the party. Everyone loves it. You’re humbled. You reward yourself with a margarita. Okay, maybe two margaritas.


Making this right this very second. Following exactly to start with..except am throwing in a couple of Thai peppers along with the 4 smallish jalapenos...which I may regret...them things are supposed to be killer hot. I will say, that it is taking significantly longer than the 10 minutes prep time for the water to simmer off (step 2), but I'm in no huge hurry....I have wine.

Looks gorgeous girl!! This looks like the perfect food group to me! I think I could live off salsa and chips! I love that you added roasted garlic, yum! I have never had a salsa in my life that didn’t have a kick of heat to it….everything down here is spicy and the one I love from Trader Joes I buy sometimes is also spicy, so I’m intrigued at how this tastes with no heat added! Now, I’m craving salsa.
I made a version of this, but I winged it, strictly from experience (tasting, not making). I used two roma tomatoes, half a sweet onion, one large jalapeno (veined/seeded), half cup cilantro, one whole lime, and a large pinch of salt. I was sure I did something wrong, but it was very good anyway. Finding this recipe was perfect for me since I did the same thing, just different proportions. I’ll do it right next time! But without the heat, a jalapeno is just a green bell pepper.
I did choose canned diced chilies in this recipe only because I wanted a milder salsa with a hint of smokiness, but if you want a spicier salsa, leave out the diced chiles and roast a couple of jalapeños along with the tomatoes. Or you can even use both. Totally up to you! Want to give it a nice kick? Use a habanero, scotch bonnet, or ghost pepper to really crank up the heat.
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