Simple, fresh and easy to make. A winning Mexican restaurant style salsa prepared with plum tomatoes, onion cilantro, and serrano peppers. Fresh tomatoes, not canned, star in this recipe. In Mexico, it is known as salsa roja (red sauce) or salsa de mesa (table sauce). And just like in the U.S., it is served in every restaurant before your meal with tortilla chips.
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More…
So pregnant me hears a Mexican song on the radio and immediately envision myself eating dinner at Mexico Restaurant. I decide it’s the chips and salsa I really want and since I’m headed to the grocery store anyway, I decide to try my hand at restaurant style salsa. Found your recipe while in the store, and made it asap when I got home. uncouldnt believe how easy it was! My mind was a bit blown that canned tomatoes are the base ingredient. My only critique would be to leave off the cumin or at least try it in a small bowl to make sure you like it before adding to the whole mixture. 

Great dish!  I got rave reviews from my family when cooking this for a special holiday dinner. Simple!  I had 5 lbs instead of 4 lbs of robs so they needed about 10 minutes more cooking time. I used a meat thermometer and let the temp rise to 130 degrees F before removing to get to med rare. Be sure to not hit a bone when taking the temp!  One other thing, tent the meat with aluminum foil while resting the meat after the oven.  Serve on a hot plate (I just microwave mine).  :)
Making this right this very second. Following exactly to start with..except am throwing in a couple of Thai peppers along with the 4 smallish jalapenos...which I may regret...them things are supposed to be killer hot. I will say, that it is taking significantly longer than the 10 minutes prep time for the water to simmer off (step 2), but I'm in no huge hurry....I have wine.

Absolutely wonderful! Just finished making IT! I made it with all fresh ingredients and added some extra little skinny cucumbers! For extra flavor a bit of Heinz Ketchup and Sriracha sauce! My husband just left to pick up some bags of Doritos. We can’t always get the “stuff” we so took for granted in Canada. Thanks so much for this incredible recipe….we both appreciate it!


Preparation – While some other salsas are cooked, Pico De Gallo is served raw. Other names for Pico De Gallo are Salsa Cruda and Salsa Fresca, which translate to raw salsa and fresh salsa. And if you can believe it, the pico de gallo translation is Rooster’s Beak. It was originally eaten by pinching pieces together between the thumb and forefinger. Crazy, right?!
This is a great salsa for beginners in Mexican cuisine. There are other salsas that are a little bit more complicated, and which require that you char the tomatoes and other veggies first. This salsa roja recipe, however, just requires that you blend the raw vegetables together, and then cook them with a bit of olive oil before adding onions and cilantro. 
This looks INCREDIBLE!! I also judge Mexican restaurants on the quality of their salsa. I became ADDICTED to chips and salsa when my son was first eating solids. Since there is little time to eat when caring for an infant, I would be feeing him with one hand and snacking on chips and salsa with the other. It is now my go-to when I’m having a snack craving!
Salsa is any one of several sauces typical of Mexican cuisine, also known as salsa fresca, hot salsa or salsa picante, particularly those used as dips. Salsa is often tomato-based, and includes ingredients such as onions, chilies, an acid and herbs. It is typically piquant, ranging from mild to extremely hot. Though many different sauce preparations are called salsa in Spanish, in English, it generally refers to raw or near-raw sauces used as dips.
I was really nervous about this recipe I searched and searched and searched this is the one I decided to do. There were a lot of reviews but most of them said all looks good all got to try this I wish they would only post if they did make it there was a couple that said it was fantastic taste was good so I chose this one. This recipe is amazing if you want restaurant style salsa you need to try this one in my portion I put one Serrano No Seeds no ribs in everybody else’s portion to whole Serrano’s. You have to try this recipe it is truly truly truly amazing and so delicious
As I mentioned above, I picked up the Missions Organics Tortilla Chips and all of the ingredients for my homemade salsa at my local Kroger in Charlottesville. You can use the store locator to find the chips in your area, and be sure to check out the additional recipe ideas as well. They’ve got Tequila Guacamole and Cheese Nachos as well as Chimichurri Steak Tacos! Oh my YUM.
Great dish!  I got rave reviews from my family when cooking this for a special holiday dinner. Simple!  I had 5 lbs instead of 4 lbs of robs so they needed about 10 minutes more cooking time. I used a meat thermometer and let the temp rise to 130 degrees F before removing to get to med rare. Be sure to not hit a bone when taking the temp!  One other thing, tent the meat with aluminum foil while resting the meat after the oven.  Serve on a hot plate (I just microwave mine).  :)

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Whenever I make this, the bowl is always left empty! The idea for a homemade mango sauce hit me after I saw a chef on television make something similar. It sounded so good, and it wasn’t something I could find in a store at the time. The salsa is especially tasty served with artisan chips —the black bean and roasted garlic ones are my favorite. When strawberries are in season, I add them into the mix, too. —Wendy Rusch, Cameron, Wisconsin
I’m a “transplant” from Wisconsin currently living in Texas. Even after 20 years, I can’t get enough of our wonderful local citrus. This is one way to work it into a main dish. The combination of tangy fruit, spicy jalapeno and distinctive cilantro is perfect over any meat, poultry or fish. We also dip into it with chips. —Lois Kildahl, McAllen, Texas

I like to keep a big jar of the homemade salsa in my refrigerator for up to a week. I serve the chips and salsa with quick weeknight dinners like quesadillas or tacos, and Keith loves them as a side with his sandwiches at lunch. The kids even dip veggies in the salsa for afternoon snacks. I’m not exaggerating when I say that this is truly a kitchen staple — whether we’re hosting a party or not!
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What is any self-respecting fiesta without some salsa? Whether it’s a themed event or not, there’s one thing that’s always a hit at any gathering: salsa, dips, and chips. There are as many salsa recipes as there are reasons to party, so we’ve collected some of our favorite salsa and dip recipes–including a killer white cheese dip–so that you can find your favorite. Never made salsa before? It’s time to ditch the jar and learn how to make salsa at home. With these easy salsa recipes, that vary from white cheese dip to cast iron salsa, to a layered black bean dip that will knock the socks off of your guests, you’ll never want to buy another jar of salsa again. These salsa recipes are three of our favorite things: impressive, easy, and crowd-pleasing. Master a few of these, and then make up your own salsa recipes–the sky’s the limit!
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Cinco de Mayo is this Thursday. You haven’t even prepared for the party you’re attending. You’re supposed to make that thing you said you would. What was it, oh yeah, salsa. Rachel was counting on you. You promised. You scour the internet for a recipe. This one on D.R. Horton’s blog pops up. You think, “How could I mess this up?” It gets made. It’s delicious. You arrive at the party, salsa in hand. You realize you brought the party. Everyone loves it. You’re humbled. You reward yourself with a margarita. Okay, maybe two margaritas.
Hi, Sommer, I was pointed to your blog by Cory Kowalski. I immediately saved your detox soup recipe AND the salsa one. I love salsa and love making it, but I can’t eat as much as I’d like to because I have kidney disease (and tomatoes aren’t good for me). I am going to try making a salsa with an extra dose of tomatilos, substituting them for some of the tomatoes. I’ll let you know how it comes out. BTW, I can’t find a ‘follow’ button on your site — except pointing to Pinterest, which I know nothing about.
Use 1-2 jalapeño peppers, depending on how spicy you like your salsa. Make sure you remove the seeds and ribs before dicing the peppers. Cut the jalapeño in half lengthwise, then take a spoon and scrape out the ribs and seeds, working from the bottom to the top of the pepper. Pro tip-wear plastic gloves when working with jalapeños to prevent burning. And never rub your eyes after dicing up a jalapeño, trust me!

Hi Mary Ann 🙂 We love cilantro, so I’ve never made this salsa without it. Most salsas actually have some cilantro in it, but if you hate the taste, you could substitute a bit of fresh parsley, or eliminate the cilantro altogether. I can’t guarantee the taste though, since my recipe uses cilantro as a big ingredient. The scoops method you mentioned sounds yummy!


The salsa is made with fresh tomatoes and peppers, and it is seasoned perfectly with cilantro and lime juice. See the tips and variations for some add-in ideas and more. The extra step of pouring boiling water over the chopped onion and garlic may be new and perplexing to some home chefs. Don't skip this step! The boiling water helps to take the bite out of the raw onions and garlic. You'll be left with their delicious flavor, while the process removes any harshness.
Tomatoes are the most important ingredient. The fresher they are the better your salsa will taste. Look for the ripest ones you can find. Getting a good char on the vegetables is another key to developing the flavor. The lime juice brightens and enhances the flavor. The recipe calls for two serrano peppers but only add one if you want to reduce the heat.
White onion.Whenever a recipe calls for an onion but it doesn’t specify what kind, it means to use a yellow onion. In this Pico de Gallo recipe, however, we want a white onion as specified.  White onions are shaper in flavor and boast a more pungent flavor which we want to balance the tomatoes, cilantro and lime.  You can use more or less chopped onion than called for.  My husband likes less onion than the traditional Pico de Gallo recipe, so I will often withhold some chopped onion from a portion and mix more onion in the rest. 
And when you’re hosting a party, have you ever noticed that the chips and salsa are the first foods to disappear? No matter how many fancy side salads, dips, or canapés folks set out, the chips and salsa are inevitably the most popular. You just can’t go wrong with the simple combo, and today I’ve upped the game. With a fresh and easy homemade salsa, you’ll never go back to the jarred store-bought version again!

I had save this recipe cause I knew it would be good, and it proved to be the best one I’ve ever made. My ratios of spices and peppers were a little altered, and I had a can of Muir Glen fire roasted, crushed tomatoes which added a little more depth perhaps, but it’s a big winner. I filed this in “Make Again” for sure! Thank you – love your emails.
We lived in West Texas for 18 years and now live in NE Pennsylvania. Didn’t have to worry about Salsa in Texas as there was a Mexican restaurant on almost every corner. Not so in PA. I have been making my Salsa (Mexican Chili) from a good Mexican friend of ours now for 12 years with some adjustments, 1 large can of Furmano’s whole tomatoes, jalapenos, cumin, coriander, salt fresh cilantro (when we can get it), minced garlic, diced yellow onions, lemon and lime juice, and some other spices. Will have to say it is VERY good.Have had many people Rave about it who are transplants like myself from Texas and California.

One thing though, I have never heard of simmering it. I switch up making mine to where I add all ingredients into a food processor and process until well mixed and chopped and then serve, or I only place the tomatoes and spices in the food processor and process until well chopped and then add the finely chopped onions, jalapenos and cilantro and then mix manually until all is well mixed. This makes for a chunkier salsa, and again I serve immediately.
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Probablemente desde hace miles de años. Hay varias leyendas que cuentan que el primer queso se pudo crear por accidente, al transportarse leche en alforjas creadas con el estómago de animales como las ovejas. La leche se cuajó y de ahí surgió el queso. Otra teoría especula que la leche se pudo cuajar al rociar la leche con ácidos como el zumo de frutas.
Made this today with my remaining garden tomatoes, roasting the tomatoes, garlic, and onions as directed. Within just a few seconds of pulsing in the food processor, the mixture turned to complete soup. I mean, there was just no salvaging a salsa type of consistency out of it. The spices are nice and I’m going to use it to make a cream of tomato soup tomorrow, but wanted to warn others who may be really needing a salsa end product. And maybe you have some tips for ensuring this doesn’t happen?
Serve slightly chilled or at room temperature. If you serve it really cold it tastes flat. The subtle flavor of the ingredients doesn’t shine through. If you are not convinced, do a taste test. Eat a batch that is ice cold and then eat batch that is at room temperature. You will see the difference. I guarantee it. Pico de gallo is best when eaten fresh.
Douglas, I was just wondering about using the iron skillet or comal and the tomatoes. I tried a different recipe the other day and used my iron skillet to toast the ancho chilies, tomatoes and serrano peppers it called for. After blending all the ingredients, I used the same skillet to heat and cook the finished sauce. I only thought about it after the fact and wondered if the acidic sauce changed in flavor by using the iron skillet. I am sure our grandmothers used their iron for everything and never worried about the acid in them, so I am sure this question is moot, but I still want to know. I am not a very good cook, even though I try, and last weeks sauce did not turn out very tasty. I am going to give this one a try and hope it comes out better. Thank you for posting this. 
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