Congratulations on your son becoming a marine. Mine is just getting out of the Navy after 8 years. And I agree with Debra above, boot camp will be the longest 13 weeks of your life. Getting mail from home is so important to them at that time, so yes, write often. My son asked me to, so I wrote him everyday and he was delighted. After a hard days work(out) it is something they look forward to. Your son will do fine and the experience will serve him well in his future career. 
Probablemente desde hace miles de años. Hay varias leyendas que cuentan que el primer queso se pudo crear por accidente, al transportarse leche en alforjas creadas con el estómago de animales como las ovejas. La leche se cuajó y de ahí surgió el queso. Otra teoría especula que la leche se pudo cuajar al rociar la leche con ácidos como el zumo de frutas.
* ~ Can be prepared several hours in advance. Combine lime juice, honey, cumin, garlic and sea salt in a small glass jar. Cover, shake well and refrigerate. Cut up other ingredients except the avocado and keep in separate containers in the refrigerator. Combine just before serving, draining oranges and tomatoes well before adding. Peel and dice avocado. Add avocado to orange mixture and gently stir to combine.
Great dish!  I got rave reviews from my family when cooking this for a special holiday dinner. Simple!  I had 5 lbs instead of 4 lbs of robs so they needed about 10 minutes more cooking time. I used a meat thermometer and let the temp rise to 130 degrees F before removing to get to med rare. Be sure to not hit a bone when taking the temp!  One other thing, tent the meat with aluminum foil while resting the meat after the oven.  Serve on a hot plate (I just microwave mine).  :)
Canned tomatoes are typically picked at their peak ripeness, which means they will be more flavorful and sweet. They are then processed within hours of being harvested to maintain the best flavor. There are different types of canned tomato products, however, diced or whole for salsas will achieve the proper consistency. Fresh tomatoes can be used in combination to add texture, however, they are much more watery since they have not be cooked to release some of the moisture. They are however excellent for chunkier dips like pico de gallo.

Seasoned to perfection with our very own sea-salt hand-harvested in the clear blue waters of Colima, Mexico, our authentic Mexican products are made with non-GMO fruits, vegetables and herbs from our farm in Northern California. Discover our fresh salsas, homemade corn tortilla chips and so much more, made by hand, with love, and the magic of seasonal, locally grown, pure ingredients.


Chips and salsa is possibly THE perfect snack. While you've probably already got your favorite jar, these homemade recipes will spice up a party, game day, or night on the couch. There's something for everyone, whether you like your salsa plain and simple or mixed with guacamole, fruit, jalapeños, and spices. Looking for more party starters? Try our amazing dip recipes.

And when you’re hosting a party, have you ever noticed that the chips and salsa are the first foods to disappear? No matter how many fancy side salads, dips, or canapés folks set out, the chips and salsa are inevitably the most popular. You just can’t go wrong with the simple combo, and today I’ve upped the game. With a fresh and easy homemade salsa, you’ll never go back to the jarred store-bought version again!


Perhaps most of you already know this delicious salsa, but hey! It is spring and grilling season is about to start, at least here in my area; and I find this a good reason to post it. Salsa Mexicana or “ Pico de Gallo Salsa” as it is known in some areas of México, is one of the simplest of Salsas and it can be ready in a matter of minutes to top your grilled chicken, steaks or fish.
This recipe is a great starting point to develop your own Mexican salsa recipe. Adjust any or all of the ingredients to suit your tastes. Although this recipe calls for charring the chiles, you can also make it without charring them. Add more chiles for a spicier sauce or reduce the number for a milder version. Substituting jalapeño chiles for the serrano chiles will make a milder salsa too.
I want to share with you my favorite salsa recipe. It has great tomato flavor with the pop of cilantro and just right amount of heat from the serrano chiles. It goes well with chips, carne asada tacos, taquitos, eggs and just about any other dish that you like to add salsa to. You will find a variation of this salsa on tables throughout Mexico. It’s a classic and with good reason.

* ~ Can be prepared several hours in advance. Combine lime juice, honey, cumin, garlic and sea salt in a small glass jar. Cover, shake well and refrigerate. Cut up other ingredients except the avocado and keep in separate containers in the refrigerator. Combine just before serving, draining oranges and tomatoes well before adding. Peel and dice avocado. Add avocado to orange mixture and gently stir to combine.

Chips and salsa is possibly THE perfect snack. While you've probably already got your favorite jar, these homemade recipes will spice up a party, game day, or night on the couch. There's something for everyone, whether you like your salsa plain and simple or mixed with guacamole, fruit, jalapeños, and spices. Looking for more party starters? Try our amazing dip recipes.
If there was ever a time to keep tortilla chips stocked in your pantry, it’s now. When tossed with lime juice, spicy chipotles, and fresh cilantro, a humble can of black beans and an ear of fresh summer corn are transformed into a bold, full-flavored salsa you’ll want to eat with everything. It’s both a crowd-pleasing dip and the base of a no-cook summer supper.

The recipe I'm sharing today is a simplified version of a roasted salsa that I normally make the "long" way--firing up the grill and roasting the chiles, and oven roasting fresh tomatoes, garlic and onions. When tomatoes and chiles are abundant in the farmer's markets in the summer, I can enough salsa to get us through the fall and winter. If you're interested in making roasted salsa from scratch with all fresh ingredients, here's that recipe. That post and recipe include canning instructions, too.
The opinions expressed on my blog are based on my own thoughts, knowledge, and experiences and are not intended to be medical advice. I am not a doctor, registered dietitian or licensed nutritionist, so please consult the appropriate health professional before making any changes to your diet, health, or other applicable areas. In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. This helps support my ability to keep on blogging! I affiliate ONLY with companies, products, services and activities I believe in and use personally.
The opinions expressed on my blog are based on my own thoughts, knowledge, and experiences and are not intended to be medical advice. I am not a doctor, registered dietitian or licensed nutritionist, so please consult the appropriate health professional before making any changes to your diet, health, or other applicable areas. In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. This helps support my ability to keep on blogging! I affiliate ONLY with companies, products, services and activities I believe in and use personally.
Simple, fresh and easy to make. A winning Mexican restaurant style salsa prepared with plum tomatoes, onion cilantro, and serrano peppers. Fresh tomatoes, not canned, star in this recipe. In Mexico, it is known as salsa roja (red sauce) or salsa de mesa (table sauce). And just like in the U.S., it is served in every restaurant before your meal with tortilla chips.
By default, this isn’t a very spicy salsa.  I would probably rate it is mild, or possibly medium if you are extra sensitive.  All 3 of my kids have eaten it from the time that they were allowed to start eating chips.  There is a little bit of heat from the ROTEL tomatoes, but it is mellowed by the lime.  You can increase the spiciness of the salsa by adding extra raw jalapeño to it in the first blending step, or by using “Hot” ROTEL tomatoes rather than original.
Most jarred, canned, and bottled salsa and picante sauces sold in the United States in grocery stores are forms of salsa cruda or pico de gallo, and typically have a semi-liquid texture. To increase their shelf lives, these salsas have been cooked to a temperature of 175 °F (79 °C), and are thus not truly cruda (raw). Some have added vinegar, and some use pickled peppers instead of fresh ones. Tomatoes are strongly acidic by nature, which, along with the heat processing, is enough to stabilize the product for grocery distribution.
Hi Mary Ann 🙂 We love cilantro, so I’ve never made this salsa without it. Most salsas actually have some cilantro in it, but if you hate the taste, you could substitute a bit of fresh parsley, or eliminate the cilantro altogether. I can’t guarantee the taste though, since my recipe uses cilantro as a big ingredient. The scoops method you mentioned sounds yummy!
Rub one 16x12" piece of parchment with a little bit of oil. Place 1 ball of meat on one half of oiled paper, then fold other half over. Using a rolling pin or wine bottle, gently roll meat into a very thin oval between parchment (it should be about 9x6"). Transfer, with parchment, to a rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with 3 more sheets of paper and remaining meat. Chill until ready to use.
While some salsa fans do not consider jarred products to be real salsa cruda, their widespread availability and long shelf life have been credited with much of salsa's enormous popularity in states outside the southwest, especially in areas where salsa is not a traditional part of the cuisine. In 1992, the dollar value of salsa sales in the United States exceeded those of tomato ketchup.[5]
Mexican food has the reputation for being heavy and greasy, unjustly deserved in my opinion. This dish is the complete opposite. All vegetables, low calories, and no fat. Totally guilt-free. Eat with reckless abandon. It is vegetarian and vegan to boot. Kids will eat it too because it is “salsa”, not yucky vegetables and it works just as well with fussy adults who don’t like vegetables.

This is the BEST salsa! The Verde is great too. I didn’t habe Serranos so used jalapenos. Salsa wasn’t “right” so sent son to store, added Serranos. Perfection! Note i use both peppers in recipe. When people come in and see tomatillos on counter they get very happy! This recipe had enhanced our lives bc it’s great. Freezes well and i can use non gmo organic ingredients. Thank you.
This recipe is a great starting point to develop your own Mexican salsa recipe. Adjust any or all of the ingredients to suit your tastes. Although this recipe calls for charring the chiles, you can also make it without charring them. Add more chiles for a spicier sauce or reduce the number for a milder version. Substituting jalapeño chiles for the serrano chiles will make a milder salsa too.
We lived in West Texas for 18 years and now live in NE Pennsylvania. Didn’t have to worry about Salsa in Texas as there was a Mexican restaurant on almost every corner. Not so in PA. I have been making my Salsa (Mexican Chili) from a good Mexican friend of ours now for 12 years with some adjustments, 1 large can of Furmano’s whole tomatoes, jalapenos, cumin, coriander, salt fresh cilantro (when we can get it), minced garlic, diced yellow onions, lemon and lime juice, and some other spices. Will have to say it is VERY good.Have had many people Rave about it who are transplants like myself from Texas and California.

A few weeks ago on Instagram, I shared my list of Mexican recipes that I was planning to make this year for Cinco De Mayo, and asked if you all had any additional requests.  And amongst the hundreds of messages I received (which made my day, so happy to be in the company of Insta friends who love Mexican food as much as I do!), I noticed that there were three words that came up again and again…and again and again and again.  Yes.
It’s all in the tomatoes… or more accurately, in how you prepare them! When making homemade Pico De Gallo, I prefer to core and remove the seeds from the tomatoes to keep the salsa from getting soupy. The salt will continue to draw out the natural juices from the tomatoes, so you’ll always end up with a juicier Pico De Gallo than when you started. If you were to keep the juiciest parts of the tomatoes, add lime juice and add the salt which will draw out even more juices, you’ll end up with a much more watery salsa than intended. It’ll still be delicious and enjoyable, just not quite the right consistency.
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