First and foremost, like any salsa, this one is a crowd-pleasing party dip. But that’s just one of the many hats it wears. On nights you don’t feel like cooking (or it’s simply too hot), spoon this hearty salsa into a soft tortilla, top with a dollop of Greek yogurt and guac, and you’ve got a no-muss, no-fuss meal on your hands. Beyond that, spoon it over grilled chicken, fish, or pork chops, or make it the star of your next burrito bowl.
Had some tomatoes from the Albuquerque grower’s market at their peak (and perhaps a tad beyond). Made the recipe as written except for an extra 3rd serrano (seeds, ribs, and all), 3 large and very fresh garlic cloves, and one chipotle en adobo. It’s cooling in the pan on the stove as I write, but I can already tell this is my new “signature” salsa. Hot diggity!

Pica media cebolla o una entera para darle al queso un sabor picante suave. Corta los extremos de la cebolla con un cuchillo de cocina y pon el lado plano hacia abajo sobre una tabla de cortar. Luego, córtala por la mitad a lo largo y retira la cáscara. Coloca una mitad boca abajo sobre la tabla de cortar y verifica que el extremo de la raíz esté apuntando hacia el lado opuesto a ti. Sostén el lado izquierdo con tu mano izquierda y haz cortes verticales en la cebolla, desplazándote de arriba hacia abajo y dejando una porción pequeña sin cortar. A continuación, gira la mitad de la cebolla a 90 grados y córtala de arriba a abajo, avanzando de derecha a izquierda.[4]


What is any self-respecting fiesta without some salsa? Whether it’s a themed event or not, there’s one thing that’s always a hit at any gathering: salsa, dips, and chips. There are as many salsa recipes as there are reasons to party, so we’ve collected some of our favorite salsa and dip recipes–including a killer white cheese dip–so that you can find your favorite. Never made salsa before? It’s time to ditch the jar and learn how to make salsa at home. With these easy salsa recipes, that vary from white cheese dip to cast iron salsa, to a layered black bean dip that will knock the socks off of your guests, you’ll never want to buy another jar of salsa again. These salsa recipes are three of our favorite things: impressive, easy, and crowd-pleasing. Master a few of these, and then make up your own salsa recipes–the sky’s the limit!
We just simply cannot get enough Salsa and Queso Recipes. If I could live on cheese dip…I would! Hello there! It’s Maryanne from The Little Epicurean. As the weather warms up, weekend party season begins. Today we’re sharing 10 salsa and queso recipes for all your appetizers needs. We’ve got traditional favorites like pico de gallo and modern twists like loaded cowboy queso dip. No matter what the celebration or gathering, you’ll find the perfect salsa or queso recipe here! Enjoy!
Pico de Gallo and I go way back! Hahaha… Yes, I can laugh about it now, but when I was 14 and 15 years old, one of my jobs on the weekends was to make huge batches of pico de gallo at my parents’ taqueria. I remember my Dad dragging me out of a sound sleep at 5 in the morning on Saturdays and Sundays to help him open up the taqueria. While my Dad was busy tending to the menudo and barbacoa, I was chopping away and trying to wake up at the same time… Now when I look back, I long for those days, that special time I spent with my Dad. And for me, I can’t have fresh salsa on my table without a fresh bowl of guacamole! Let the weekend begin and don’t forget the chips! #mexicanfood #foodieforlife 
When I googled pico de gallo before writing this post, the first thing that popped up was actually a question — just what is pico de gallo?  Translation: in Spanish, it literally means “beak of the rooster.”  I’ve heard all sorts of stories over the years about why this is.  Some say that the bright colors of the salsa resemble a rooster, others say that the diced salsa resembles bird food, others say that “pico” is referring to the word “picante” which means spicy, and on and on.  Lots of theories.  ;)
I’m a “transplant” from Wisconsin currently living in Texas. Even after 20 years, I can’t get enough of our wonderful local citrus. This is one way to work it into a main dish. The combination of tangy fruit, spicy jalapeno and distinctive cilantro is perfect over any meat, poultry or fish. We also dip into it with chips. —Lois Kildahl, McAllen, Texas
This is a great salsa for beginners in Mexican cuisine. There are other salsas that are a little bit more complicated, and which require that you char the tomatoes and other veggies first. This salsa roja recipe, however, just requires that you blend the raw vegetables together, and then cook them with a bit of olive oil before adding onions and cilantro. 

Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More…

So when it comes to salsa, I think we are all in agreement that the one with avocados is pretty much always the winner, but a pair or trio of dips never hurt anybody. If you’re hosting a fajita night, check out these other easy Mexican dip recipes perfect for entertaining: crockpot taco queso, fresh salsa, and authentic guacamole would all look lovely next to a bowl of your creamy tomatillo avocado salsa! Please, enjoy!


It’s all in the tomatoes… or more accurately, in how you prepare them! When making homemade Pico De Gallo, I prefer to core and remove the seeds from the tomatoes to keep the salsa from getting soupy. The salt will continue to draw out the natural juices from the tomatoes, so you’ll always end up with a juicier Pico De Gallo than when you started. If you were to keep the juiciest parts of the tomatoes, add lime juice and add the salt which will draw out even more juices, you’ll end up with a much more watery salsa than intended. It’ll still be delicious and enjoyable, just not quite the right consistency.
I love cilantro, but this recipe calls for waaay too much of it. I started out with 2 T., then added another, and then another for a total of about 1/4 C. I used fresh cilantro from my garden and maybe that’s more pungent than the store-bought variety. But, had I used the 2/3 C. which the recipe called for I’m sure it would have overwhelmed all the other ingredients. As it is, the 1/4 C. gave the pico a nice cilantro “presence” while still letting all the other wonderful flavors shine through.

Living in Carlsbad (Southern California), we go out to Mexican food a LOT.  No matter what I order, I ensure there is a big pile of fresh Pico de Gallo on my plate.  It’s a staple at every Mexican restaurant and at every Mexican table for a reason. It simply doesn’t get much easier or more freshly delicious than Pico de Gallo.  It adds a punch of vibrant flavor to every dish or is just as delicious scooped up by a chip.   So to make every Mexican dish you serve better and in preparation of my Al Pastor Tacos coming later this week (below – eeek!  so excited to share!), I thought it high time I brought you this easyPico de Gallo recipe.
I know when I say tomatillo, some of you are already headed for the hills, but halt those steps for just a moment, and allow me to ease your nightshade veggie fears. Cause that’s all they are, ya know? A little nightshade vegetable that comes equipped with its very own little wrapper. So essentially, we’ve got ourselves a green little tomato in its very own little jacket, that goes by the name husk.

As if you needed any more good news, this homemade salsa can be prepared in about 5 minutes at any time of year! In the summer it’s delicious with seasonally ripe tomatoes, peppers, and herbs, but it’s also easy to make in the off-season with a can of tomatoes and canned chilies. Don’t let the weather stop you from enjoying fresh chips and salsa whenever a craving strikes…
Canned tomatoes are typically picked at their peak ripeness, which means they will be more flavorful and sweet. They are then processed within hours of being harvested to maintain the best flavor. There are different types of canned tomato products, however, diced or whole for salsas will achieve the proper consistency. Fresh tomatoes can be used in combination to add texture, however, they are much more watery since they have not be cooked to release some of the moisture. They are however excellent for chunkier dips like pico de gallo.

The recipe I'm sharing today is a simplified version of a roasted salsa that I normally make the "long" way--firing up the grill and roasting the chiles, and oven roasting fresh tomatoes, garlic and onions. When tomatoes and chiles are abundant in the farmer's markets in the summer, I can enough salsa to get us through the fall and winter. If you're interested in making roasted salsa from scratch with all fresh ingredients, here's that recipe. That post and recipe include canning instructions, too.


Agrega sal y pimienta al gusto a esta preparación y remueve siempre a fuego bajo, después incorpora la leche poco a poco y ve removiendo. Ten en cuenta que si utilizas las dos tazas de leche sugeridas tu salsa de queso quedará más líquida, mientras que si empleas una menor cantidad será más contundente y espesa. Esta textura es la adecuada para una salsa de queso Cheddar, por ejemplo.


Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More…
I’m a “transplant” from Wisconsin currently living in Texas. Even after 20 years, I can’t get enough of our wonderful local citrus. This is one way to work it into a main dish. The combination of tangy fruit, spicy jalapeno and distinctive cilantro is perfect over any meat, poultry or fish. We also dip into it with chips. —Lois Kildahl, McAllen, Texas
One thing though, I have never heard of simmering it. I switch up making mine to where I add all ingredients into a food processor and process until well mixed and chopped and then serve, or I only place the tomatoes and spices in the food processor and process until well chopped and then add the finely chopped onions, jalapenos and cilantro and then mix manually until all is well mixed. This makes for a chunkier salsa, and again I serve immediately.

Rub one 16x12" piece of parchment with a little bit of oil. Place 1 ball of meat on one half of oiled paper, then fold other half over. Using a rolling pin or wine bottle, gently roll meat into a very thin oval between parchment (it should be about 9x6"). Transfer, with parchment, to a rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with 3 more sheets of paper and remaining meat. Chill until ready to use.

This looks INCREDIBLE!! I also judge Mexican restaurants on the quality of their salsa. I became ADDICTED to chips and salsa when my son was first eating solids. Since there is little time to eat when caring for an infant, I would be feeing him with one hand and snacking on chips and salsa with the other. It is now my go-to when I’m having a snack craving!

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