Preparation – While some other salsas are cooked, Pico De Gallo is served raw. Other names for Pico De Gallo are Salsa Cruda and Salsa Fresca, which translate to raw salsa and fresh salsa. And if you can believe it, the pico de gallo translation is Rooster’s Beak. It was originally eaten by pinching pieces together between the thumb and forefinger. Crazy, right?!
While some salsa fans do not consider jarred products to be real salsa cruda, their widespread availability and long shelf life have been credited with much of salsa's enormous popularity in states outside the southwest, especially in areas where salsa is not a traditional part of the cuisine. In 1992, the dollar value of salsa sales in the United States exceeded those of tomato ketchup.[5]

This is pretty much my exact recipe, only I stopped measuring a long time ago and I’ve never tried using canned tomatoes along with the fresh. Fresh salsa is definitely the way to go. I can’t even eat canned salsa anymore. One thing I do sometimes to add depth is to roast the tomato, garlic, and jalapeno (just throw it all on a baking sheet and let it go for about 20 minutes at 400F, turning once if I’m not feeling too lazy). This in combo with the fresh cilantro and lime juice gets rave reviews. I bet using canned tomatoes would add a similar depth!
Made this yesterday w/my sister & we served it to our husbands & they thought it was the best ever! We all couldn’ Stop eating it!! Also so easy to make. I added a step. If you like salsa w/o tomato skins, just slice in half & lay face down on sheet pan w/parchment paper. In oven on broil about 5 minutes, the skins wrinkle right up & pull off easily!
I came across this easy and tasty snack while searching online for healthy munchies for kids. Great for after school, it’s really quick to make and filling enough to hold the kids until dinner. To satisfy heftier appetites or to serve as a power lunch, cut each tortilla into fewer pieces or provide one per child. The recipe is easy to increase as needed. —Mary Haluch, Ludlow, Massachusetts

Pico de Gallo is quick and easy, made with only a handful of ingredients, amazingly fresh and healthy and makes everything taste 1000X better! It's made with just tomatoes, onions, cilantro, jalapenos, lime juice, salt and pepper.  It takes minutes to whip up and is great as a party appetizer, snack with chips, or pile it on your favorite enchiladas, nachos, tacos and more!
Chips and salsa are one of my all-time favorite appetizers and snacks. If I open a bag a chips and start dipping, you can count on that bag of chips being gone by the end of the hour. I have no self control when it comes to snacking on chips and salsa! I want to eat them all and I usually do. My favorite salsa is Pico de Gallo because it is so simple and fresh! You can’t go wrong with this classic salsa.
While this recipe can be made any time of the year, I decided to dress up my roll-ups for the holidays! With clever stacking and a few “ornaments,” I made a roll-up Christmas tree! It’s fun to do, and the festive presentation will make this appetizer even more appealing to your holiday guests. Let me show you how quickly the roll-ups come together, plus my ideas for serving them.

Hi, Sommer, I was pointed to your blog by Cory Kowalski. I immediately saved your detox soup recipe AND the salsa one. I love salsa and love making it, but I can’t eat as much as I’d like to because I have kidney disease (and tomatoes aren’t good for me). I am going to try making a salsa with an extra dose of tomatilos, substituting them for some of the tomatoes. I’ll let you know how it comes out. BTW, I can’t find a ‘follow’ button on your site — except pointing to Pinterest, which I know nothing about.
¿Como la elaboramos? Cortamos el queso en trozos (podemos utilizar diferentes tipos de queso, para hacer una salsa más especial y propia), lo ponemos sobre el bol o taza y le echamos una cucharada de leche (se utiliza para que no se solidifique el queso), un poco más si el queso que utilizamos es más seco. Lo metemos al microondas hasta que derrita y voilà cést fini, listo para servir.
This is a great salsa for beginners in Mexican cuisine. There are other salsas that are a little bit more complicated, and which require that you char the tomatoes and other veggies first. This salsa roja recipe, however, just requires that you blend the raw vegetables together, and then cook them with a bit of olive oil before adding onions and cilantro. 
I really believe that salsa is best when only a few key ingredients are involved. While there are so many recipes for this dip, literally millions and some with dozens of ingredients, I still believe in my mantra: simple is always best. This recipe is the perfect accompaniment for quesadillas, fajitas, taquitos, or served beside some homemade guac. You name it!
Great pico de gallo recipe, I personally like my salsa juicy so I use large tomatoes and extra lime juice. I also use this as a base for another recipe, A shrimp salsa dish, I add large chunks of cold cooked shrimp, and either Clamato juice or tomato juice and clam juice I also like a little extra cilantro. Served with French bread to dip into the juice makes a great lunch
Just made this to top with your crock pot chicken tacos, I’m in HEAVEN. This salsa is so quick to put together and the flavor is incredible. I use one can of Original Rotel and one of the mild. I always keep sliced jalapeños in a jar in my fridge so I threw in a couple of those for some heat and you’re right, tastes WAY better than a restaurant. I’m going to make another batch for this weekend!
I really believe that salsa is best when only a few key ingredients are involved. While there are so many recipes for this dip, literally millions and some with dozens of ingredients, I still believe in my mantra: simple is always best. This recipe is the perfect accompaniment for quesadillas, fajitas, taquitos, or served beside some homemade guac. You name it!
While using a food processor is completely optional, it is recommended. It's the easiest and fastest way to blend all of the ingredients together. A blender can work as well, but I would recommend either working in batches or stopping to stir a few times, so that the bottom doesn't become pure liquid! Chopping all of your vegetables by hand would take a bit of time, but you can do that for more of a pico de gallo–style salsa, if you prefer! 
Hi, Sommer, I was pointed to your blog by Cory Kowalski. I immediately saved your detox soup recipe AND the salsa one. I love salsa and love making it, but I can’t eat as much as I’d like to because I have kidney disease (and tomatoes aren’t good for me). I am going to try making a salsa with an extra dose of tomatilos, substituting them for some of the tomatoes. I’ll let you know how it comes out. BTW, I can’t find a ‘follow’ button on your site — except pointing to Pinterest, which I know nothing about.
Outside Mexico and Central America, the following salsas are common to each of the following regions; in Argentina and the Southern Cone, chimichurri sauce is common. Chimichurri is "a spicy vinegar-parsley sauce that is the salsa (and leading condiment) in Argentina and Uruguay, served with grilled meat. It is made of chopped fresh parsley and onion, seasoned with garlic, oregano, salt, cayenne chilies and black pepper and bound with oil and vinegar."[3] In Costa Rica, dishes are prepared with salsa Lizano, a thin, smooth, light brown sauce. In Cuba and the Caribbean, a typical salsa is mojo. Unlike the tomato-based salsas, mojo typically consists of olive oil, garlic, and citrus juice, and is used both to marinate meats and as a dipping sauce. In Peru, a traditional salsa is peri peri or piri piri sauce: "The national condiment of Peru, peri-peri sauce is made in medium to hot levels of spiciness—the more chili, or the hotter variety of chile used, the hotter the sauce. Original peri-peri uses the African bird’s eye chili (the Swahili word for the chili is peri-peri). Milder sauces may use only cayenne and serrano chilies. To a base of vinegar and oil, garlic and lemon juice are added, plus other seasonings, which often include paprika or tomato paste for flavor and color, onions and herb—each company has its own recipe. It is also used as a cooking sauce."[4]
Congratulations on your son becoming a marine. Mine is just getting out of the Navy after 8 years. And I agree with Debra above, boot camp will be the longest 13 weeks of your life. Getting mail from home is so important to them at that time, so yes, write often. My son asked me to, so I wrote him everyday and he was delighted. After a hard days work(out) it is something they look forward to. Your son will do fine and the experience will serve him well in his future career. 
×