First and foremost, like any salsa, this one is a crowd-pleasing party dip. But that’s just one of the many hats it wears. On nights you don’t feel like cooking (or it’s simply too hot), spoon this hearty salsa into a soft tortilla, top with a dollop of Greek yogurt and guac, and you’ve got a no-muss, no-fuss meal on your hands. Beyond that, spoon it over grilled chicken, fish, or pork chops, or make it the star of your next burrito bowl.
Douglas, I was just wondering about using the iron skillet or comal and the tomatoes. I tried a different recipe the other day and used my iron skillet to toast the ancho chilies, tomatoes and serrano peppers it called for. After blending all the ingredients, I used the same skillet to heat and cook the finished sauce. I only thought about it after the fact and wondered if the acidic sauce changed in flavor by using the iron skillet. I am sure our grandmothers used their iron for everything and never worried about the acid in them, so I am sure this question is moot, but I still want to know. I am not a very good cook, even though I try, and last weeks sauce did not turn out very tasty. I am going to give this one a try and hope it comes out better. Thank you for posting this.
While some people may choose to make their homemade salsa with fresh tomatoes only (I used to be one of them) I’ve actually come around to believe that canned tomatoes are your better option for restaurant-style salsa. Because canned tomatoes are picked at the height of tomato season and canned with a high-heat technique to preserve the flavor, canned tomatoes will often taste fresher than the out-of-season tomatoes that you can buy year ’round at the grocery store. That means 11 months out of the year (in most regions) canned tomatoes will actually taste fresher.

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Great dish!  I got rave reviews from my family when cooking this for a special holiday dinner. Simple!  I had 5 lbs instead of 4 lbs of robs so they needed about 10 minutes more cooking time. I used a meat thermometer and let the temp rise to 130 degrees F before removing to get to med rare. Be sure to not hit a bone when taking the temp!  One other thing, tent the meat with aluminum foil while resting the meat after the oven.  Serve on a hot plate (I just microwave mine).  :)
Tomatoes. Choose deeply colored, firm with-with-a-little-give, ripe tomatoes for maximum flavor because this recipe centers around the tomatoes.  We want ripe for flavor but not too ripe or they will get mushy and fall apart.  Also, make sure they smell like a tomato – if they don’t smell then they will taste like cardboard.  You can use plum tomatoes, but I prefer Roma tomatoes because they have fewer seeds to scoop out.
When I was pregnant with my son, I was completely addicted to Chili’s salsa and chips.  I wanted to eat there ALL the time, and even when I wasn’t eating there I was trying to convince my husband to stop there on his way home to pick up some take out lol.  He was always less than pleased.  I still love their salsa, but since it’s not really cost effective to buy it, or go out to eat all the time, I figured that I would just find a way to make it at home 🙂
Rub one 16x12" piece of parchment with a little bit of oil. Place 1 ball of meat on one half of oiled paper, then fold other half over. Using a rolling pin or wine bottle, gently roll meat into a very thin oval between parchment (it should be about 9x6"). Transfer, with parchment, to a rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with 3 more sheets of paper and remaining meat. Chill until ready to use.

Salsa is any one of several sauces typical of Mexican cuisine, also known as salsa fresca, hot salsa or salsa picante, particularly those used as dips. Salsa is often tomato-based, and includes ingredients such as onions, chilies, an acid and herbs. It is typically piquant, ranging from mild to extremely hot. Though many different sauce preparations are called salsa in Spanish, in English, it generally refers to raw or near-raw sauces used as dips.
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