If salsa isn’t your thing, it’s other half, guacamole, is always an option. We think it should count as its own food group, but that’s another story. If you’re wanting some guac recipes that’ll hit just as hard as Chipotle’s, scoot on over here and check out Food Network’s Alton Brown’s guacamole recipe or better yet, any of the recipes they have for the velvety goodness that is the avocado.
Made this yesterday w/my sister & we served it to our husbands & they thought it was the best ever! We all couldn’ Stop eating it!! Also so easy to make. I added a step. If you like salsa w/o tomato skins, just slice in half & lay face down on sheet pan w/parchment paper. In oven on broil about 5 minutes, the skins wrinkle right up & pull off easily! 

Now, this is how seriously easy this salsa is to make, folks: The avocados? They don’t even have to be chopped. Just quarter them and throw those suckers in your blender (well, skin and seed removed, of course), along with some quartered tomatillos, half of a roughly chopped onion and garlic clove, along with a few cilantro leaves for flavor, and a roughly chopped jalapeno for a little heat.
Bottom line, pico de gallo is a salsa from Mexico, also known as salsa fresca (fresh salsa), salsa cruda (raw salsa), and salsa huevona (lazy salsa).  It’s traditionally made from chopped fresh tomatoes, onion, chiles (jalapeños or serranos), cilantro, salt and lime juice.  It’s always served chopped, not blended or pureed or mashed.  And it’s used in about a million ways, from sprinkling on tacos and tamales and tostadas, to scooping up with your favorite tortilla chips.
@Carl. My wife is Mexican and I’ve traveled there many times; particularly the state of Michoacán where she’s from. In Mexico, the sauce that you make is called a “Salsa Cruda” (Raw Sauce). It is perfectly fine to make it without frying/simmering since it’s just one of the MANY ways to make a sauce in the Mexican kitchen. I must say that adding cumin to a sauce is more typical of Tex Mex than the authentic Mexican style sauce. Also, lime is only added to something such as pico de gallo. Salsa verde is another sauce that made by cooking tomatillos, jalapeños and a couple garlic cloves in slightly boiling water for about 10 min. Once the tomatillos are cooked, you add them with a little bit of the cooking water, the chilies, garlic, a piece of white onion, cilantro and salt to a food processor. This is carefully processed due to the hot liquid. Tomatillos can be pretty acidic so a pinch of sugar can be added to counter that. I’ve been in a ranch in Michoacán where they cooked a goat over a wood fire. I saw them make the “birria” (typical Mexican sauce for roasted meats) over the same wood fire. It picked up the smoke taste and I’ll tell you, it was the best BBQ goat that I EVER had!
When I was pregnant with my son, I was completely addicted to Chili’s salsa and chips.  I wanted to eat there ALL the time, and even when I wasn’t eating there I was trying to convince my husband to stop there on his way home to pick up some take out lol.  He was always less than pleased.  I still love their salsa, but since it’s not really cost effective to buy it, or go out to eat all the time, I figured that I would just find a way to make it at home 🙂
Serve slightly chilled or at room temperature. If you serve it really cold it tastes flat. The subtle flavor of the ingredients doesn’t shine through. If you are not convinced, do a taste test. Eat a batch that is ice cold and then eat batch that is at room temperature. You will see the difference. I guarantee it. Pico de gallo is best when eaten fresh.
It’s easy to make either a coarse salsa with just a knife and chopping board - alternatively, for a smooth salsa, whizz the ingredients in a food processor. Serve salsa with tortilla chips and dips such as guacamole or soured cream, or use it as a sauce or for topping pasta or pizza. Fruit salsas made with mango or pineapple go well with grilled fish or chicken.
Now, this is how seriously easy this salsa is to make, folks: The avocados? They don’t even have to be chopped. Just quarter them and throw those suckers in your blender (well, skin and seed removed, of course), along with some quartered tomatillos, half of a roughly chopped onion and garlic clove, along with a few cilantro leaves for flavor, and a roughly chopped jalapeno for a little heat.
Let me know how many times you had to slap your hand from eating it ALL! Leave a comment here, find me on Facebook or tag me on Instagram in your main comment at both @veggiesdontbite #veggiesdontbite so I don’t miss it! I respond to all your comments, I’m never ignoring you! And while I respond, I am most likely snacking on this salsa and chips. It’s addicting. But I can stop if I want. Who am I kidding, no I can’t…
First and foremost, like any salsa, this one is a crowd-pleasing party dip. But that’s just one of the many hats it wears. On nights you don’t feel like cooking (or it’s simply too hot), spoon this hearty salsa into a soft tortilla, top with a dollop of Greek yogurt and guac, and you’ve got a no-muss, no-fuss meal on your hands. Beyond that, spoon it over grilled chicken, fish, or pork chops, or make it the star of your next burrito bowl.

White onion.Whenever a recipe calls for an onion but it doesn’t specify what kind, it means to use a yellow onion. In this Pico de Gallo recipe, however, we want a white onion as specified.  White onions are shaper in flavor and boast a more pungent flavor which we want to balance the tomatoes, cilantro and lime.  You can use more or less chopped onion than called for.  My husband likes less onion than the traditional Pico de Gallo recipe, so I will often withhold some chopped onion from a portion and mix more onion in the rest. 
“From Rick Bayless, 'Authentic Mexican.' If you're looking for an authentic Mexican salsa, this is it! It's so simple too! I only use one onion and two jalapenos when I make it, but I decided I'd post the original recipe instead of altering it. The way I make it produces a medium heat. I'd imagine making it his way would produce a hot salsa. I really like it with the lime juice. I haven't made it with the vinegar yet.”

Tomatoes are the most important ingredient. The fresher they are the better your salsa will taste. Look for the ripest ones you can find. Getting a good char on the vegetables is another key to developing the flavor. The lime juice brightens and enhances the flavor. The recipe calls for two serrano peppers but only add one if you want to reduce the heat.
First and foremost, like any salsa, this one is a crowd-pleasing party dip. But that’s just one of the many hats it wears. On nights you don’t feel like cooking (or it’s simply too hot), spoon this hearty salsa into a soft tortilla, top with a dollop of Greek yogurt and guac, and you’ve got a no-muss, no-fuss meal on your hands. Beyond that, spoon it over grilled chicken, fish, or pork chops, or make it the star of your next burrito bowl.

The addition of fresh onions give this pico de gallo recipe the perfect zing, and the lime helps add freshness while jalapenos add the perfect bit of heat. If you aren’t a big fan of spice be sure to remove all of the membranes and seeds from your jalapenos! This recipe tastes best after it sits for about 20-30 minutes, so the flavors can really blend!
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