I grew up in New Mexico and Arizona, so I have a life-long connection to Mexican food. It's my favorite food. I like it spicy. It's the first kind of food I ever learned to cook. When we were very young (still in elementary school), my sister Nelda and I could prepare an entire Mexican meal of enchiladas and taquitos. It was kind of our sister specialty. Nelda made taquitos the last time we were together--a delicious comfort food from the past.
Ralla 1/2 cucharadita de nuez moscada fresca para aportar un sabor picante y dulce. Coloca la semilla de nuez moscada sobre una tabla de cortar y aplástala con el lado plano de un cuchillo de cocina. Pela la cáscara hasta dejar expuesta la nuez. Sostén un rallador plano en un ángulo de 45 grados con respecto a la tabla de cortar. Sujeta la punta de la semilla con el pulgar y el dedo índice y desliza el borde de la semilla hacia abajo por el rallador, en pasadas de 5 cm (2 pulgadas).[3]

Where does nutrition info come from? Nutrition facts are provided as a courtesy, sourced from the USDA Food Database. You can find individual ingredient carb counts we use in the Low Carb & Keto Food List. Carb count excludes sugar alcohols. Net carb count excludes both fiber and sugar alcohols, because these do not affect blood sugar in most people. We try to be accurate, but feel free to make your own calculations.
I’m a “transplant” from Wisconsin currently living in Texas. Even after 20 years, I can’t get enough of our wonderful local citrus. This is one way to work it into a main dish. The combination of tangy fruit, spicy jalapeno and distinctive cilantro is perfect over any meat, poultry or fish. We also dip into it with chips. —Lois Kildahl, McAllen, Texas
Salsa and Queso Recipes are some of our favorite appetizers on the planet! Nothing beats a night of staying in and enjoying EASY Mexican food at home. These Salsa Recipes and Queso Recipes hit all the high notes with none of the fuss. The BEST Salsas and Cheese Dips you’ll ever come across and the only recipes you’ll ever need for game day or Cinco de Mayo!

Bottom line, pico de gallo is a salsa from Mexico, also known as salsa fresca (fresh salsa), salsa cruda (raw salsa), and salsa huevona (lazy salsa).  It’s traditionally made from chopped fresh tomatoes, onion, chiles (jalapeños or serranos), cilantro, salt and lime juice.  It’s always served chopped, not blended or pureed or mashed.  And it’s used in about a million ways, from sprinkling on tacos and tamales and tostadas, to scooping up with your favorite tortilla chips.
I'm on the hunt for an out-of-this-world pico de gallo recipe. While this was not it, this will be my go-to base recipe for the time being. Fresh and good. Make sure to drain as much liquid from the tomatoes as possible during seeding and chopping. Let the lime juice and seasonings stand out by eliminating tomato liquid completely. Day 2 the flavor was still good in our case.

Tomatoes. Choose deeply colored, firm with-with-a-little-give, ripe tomatoes for maximum flavor because this recipe centers around the tomatoes.  We want ripe for flavor but not too ripe or they will get mushy and fall apart.  Also, make sure they smell like a tomato – if they don’t smell then they will taste like cardboard.  You can use plum tomatoes, but I prefer Roma tomatoes because they have fewer seeds to scoop out.

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