The Engine 2 Diet has sold hundreds of thousands of copies and inspired a plant-based food revolution. Featuring endorsements from top medical experts and a food line in Whole Foods Market, Engine 2 is the most trusted name in plant-based eating. Now, readers can bring the Engine 2 program into their kitchens with this cookbook companion to the original diet program. Engine 2 started in a firehouse in Texas, and if Texas firefighters love to eat this food, readers nationwide will eat it up, too! THE ENGINE 2 COOKBOOK packs the life-saving promise of the Engine 2 program into more than 130 mouth-watering, crowd-pleasing recipes that are designed to help readers lose weight, lower cholesterol, and improve their health, one delicious bite at a time.

You can easily make enough to feed a large crowd or have some extra to freeze so that you can have it on hand any time the chips and salsa craving hits or company stops by.  You can also cut the recipe in half for a personal sized little batch of salsa.  You won’t want to more than double the recipe because generally the blender or food processor won’t be big enough.
Según la FAO se producen en el mundo alrededor de 18 millones de tonelada. La historia de este alimento es larga . La evidencia más temprana se remonta al 5500 a.C en Polonia. La cultura babilónica en el segundo milenio antes de Cristo ya elaboraba queso. Hay constancia de ello gracias a la escritura cuneiforme. En la actualidad el mayor productor de queso a nivel mundial es Estados Unidos, seguido de Alemania, Francia, Italia y Países Bajos.
Deja hervir la salsa a fuego lento por 8 a 10 minutos o hasta que adopte una consistencia homogénea. Cuando la salsa empiece a hervir y a formar burbujas, baja la temperatura al mínimo o hasta el número más bajo de la perilla. Esto la llevará a fuego lento, justo por debajo del punto de ebullición, mientras sigue calentándose. Cuando la salsa tenga una consistencia homogénea, retírala del fuego.[10]
To make chunky salsa: with a knife (or with your hands!), chop tomatoes until they are in bite-sized pieces. Finely dice the onion and jalapeno (taking out the seeds and membrane decreases the heat), making sure to thoroughly wash your hands after handling the jalapeno. Mince the garlic, and use your knife to flatten the garlic, making it into a sort of paste, and add it to the mixture. Add the salt and the cumin. Chop the cilantro finely, and add to the mixture. Lastly, squeze in your lime juice, and stir it well!
By default, this isn’t a very spicy salsa.  I would probably rate it is mild, or possibly medium if you are extra sensitive.  All 3 of my kids have eaten it from the time that they were allowed to start eating chips.  There is a little bit of heat from the ROTEL tomatoes, but it is mellowed by the lime.  You can increase the spiciness of the salsa by adding extra raw jalapeño to it in the first blending step, or by using “Hot” ROTEL tomatoes rather than original.
We’ve been making this delicious Corn and Black Bean Salsa for years whenever we are having friends over, or when we are heading out to a friend’s house for a cookout. It’s a great dip / appetizer to have with Mexican themed dinners, for taco night and just to have as a crowd pleasing snack. The great thing about this recipe is that it is super easy to make. It’s about 1/2 canned goods and 1/2 fresh ingredients, and it literally only takes a few minutes to put together. 

While using a food processor is completely optional, it is recommended. It's the easiest and fastest way to blend all of the ingredients together. A blender can work as well, but I would recommend either working in batches or stopping to stir a few times, so that the bottom doesn't become pure liquid! Chopping all of your vegetables by hand would take a bit of time, but you can do that for more of a pico de gallo–style salsa, if you prefer! 
Incorpora la harina a la mantequilla derretida y cocina la mezcla por 1 o 2 minutos. Sostén el batidor entre el pulgar y el dedo índice y muévelo alrededor de la cacerola con un movimiento circular. Deja que el mango del batidor se mueva ligeramente en tu mano. Sigue batiendo aún después de haber incorporado la harina para eliminar el sabor harinoso. Mantén el fuego bajo y cocina la mezcla por 1 o 2 minutos después de la incorporación de la harina.[7]
The Engine 2 Diet has sold hundreds of thousands of copies and inspired a plant-based food revolution. Featuring endorsements from top medical experts and a food line in Whole Foods Market, Engine 2 is the most trusted name in plant-based eating. Now, readers can bring the Engine 2 program into their kitchens with this cookbook companion to the original diet program. Engine 2 started in a firehouse in Texas, and if Texas firefighters love to eat this food, readers nationwide will eat it up, too! THE ENGINE 2 COOKBOOK packs the life-saving promise of the Engine 2 program into more than 130 mouth-watering, crowd-pleasing recipes that are designed to help readers lose weight, lower cholesterol, and improve their health, one delicious bite at a time.
Here at Delish, we are firm believers that everything tastes better after it's been roasted (hello, brussels sprouts!), and that's why we opted to roast a few of our salsa ingredients. It brings out the flavors of the jalapeños and deeply sweeten the cherry tomatoes. It takes away some of the pungency of the onion and gives it a more caramelized flavor. This is what will make your salsa stand out above all the rest. 
Had some tomatoes from the Albuquerque grower’s market at their peak (and perhaps a tad beyond). Made the recipe as written except for an extra 3rd serrano (seeds, ribs, and all), 3 large and very fresh garlic cloves, and one chipotle en adobo. It’s cooling in the pan on the stove as I write, but I can already tell this is my new “signature” salsa. Hot diggity!

Great dish!  I got rave reviews from my family when cooking this for a special holiday dinner. Simple!  I had 5 lbs instead of 4 lbs of robs so they needed about 10 minutes more cooking time. I used a meat thermometer and let the temp rise to 130 degrees F before removing to get to med rare. Be sure to not hit a bone when taking the temp!  One other thing, tent the meat with aluminum foil while resting the meat after the oven.  Serve on a hot plate (I just microwave mine).  :)
Hi there 🙂 Precise serving sizes are so hard to quantify, since it all depends on how much each person eats lol. But the recipe makes approximately 4 cups, so I think that would be enough for 9 people… although, to be on the safe side, you could always double the recipe. Leftovers are good for a week or two in the refrigerator 🙂 Hope you love it!
I love cilantro, but this recipe calls for waaay too much of it. I started out with 2 T., then added another, and then another for a total of about 1/4 C. I used fresh cilantro from my garden and maybe that’s more pungent than the store-bought variety. But, had I used the 2/3 C. which the recipe called for I’m sure it would have overwhelmed all the other ingredients. As it is, the 1/4 C. gave the pico a nice cilantro “presence” while still letting all the other wonderful flavors shine through.

Where does nutrition info come from? Nutrition facts are provided as a courtesy, sourced from the USDA Food Database. You can find individual ingredient carb counts we use in the Low Carb & Keto Food List. Carb count excludes sugar alcohols. Net carb count excludes both fiber and sugar alcohols, because these do not affect blood sugar in most people. We try to be accurate, but feel free to make your own calculations.
@Carl. My wife is Mexican and I’ve traveled there many times; particularly the state of Michoacán where she’s from. In Mexico, the sauce that you make is called a “Salsa Cruda” (Raw Sauce). It is perfectly fine to make it without frying/simmering since it’s just one of the MANY ways to make a sauce in the Mexican kitchen. I must say that adding cumin to a sauce is more typical of Tex Mex than the authentic Mexican style sauce. Also, lime is only added to something such as pico de gallo. Salsa verde is another sauce that made by cooking tomatillos, jalapeños and a couple garlic cloves in slightly boiling water for about 10 min. Once the tomatillos are cooked, you add them with a little bit of the cooking water, the chilies, garlic, a piece of white onion, cilantro and salt to a food processor. This is carefully processed due to the hot liquid. Tomatillos can be pretty acidic so a pinch of sugar can be added to counter that. I’ve been in a ranch in Michoacán where they cooked a goat over a wood fire. I saw them make the “birria” (typical Mexican sauce for roasted meats) over the same wood fire. It picked up the smoke taste and I’ll tell you, it was the best BBQ goat that I EVER had!

Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, photographer, videographer, clean eating expert, and mommy of four. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration.
Just finished preparing this and it turned out awesome! I basically took the original recipe and eyeball quadrupled it. Honestly the easiest recipe ever. My food processor wasn’t big enough so I did it in batches and stirred it all up in a mixing bowl. The apple cider vinegar cuts the acidity and the lime brings out all of the fresh flavors. The salt makes it all come together. Thanks.
Texas is known for its Tex Mex cuisine, and it just so happens to be one of my favorite things about my native state. If you’ve never made it down to these parts, allow me to paint you a picture: You walk into a restaurant. Nothing too fancy, but the smell immediately seduces every last one of your taste buds. You’ll take a quick glance around, and you can’t help but notice there are baskets of warm, paper-thin tortilla chips on every table, accompanied by salsa.
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Most jarred, canned, and bottled salsa and picante sauces sold in the United States in grocery stores are forms of salsa cruda or pico de gallo, and typically have a semi-liquid texture. To increase their shelf lives, these salsas have been cooked to a temperature of 175 °F (79 °C), and are thus not truly cruda (raw). Some have added vinegar, and some use pickled peppers instead of fresh ones. Tomatoes are strongly acidic by nature, which, along with the heat processing, is enough to stabilize the product for grocery distribution.
The main characters in this flavorful salsa are sweet, juicy navel oranges and creamy, crowd-pleasing avocados. I zested the oranges before sectioning them adding an extra layer of citrus delight. Sweet onion, cherry tomatoes, seedless cucumbers and finely chopped jalapeño complete the cast. Of course a generous helping of chopped cilantro adds a fresh zip to any salsa, but if you’re not a fan, a shower of finely chopped fresh basil will work just as well.
Hi Mary Ann 🙂 We love cilantro, so I’ve never made this salsa without it. Most salsas actually have some cilantro in it, but if you hate the taste, you could substitute a bit of fresh parsley, or eliminate the cilantro altogether. I can’t guarantee the taste though, since my recipe uses cilantro as a big ingredient. The scoops method you mentioned sounds yummy!
Let sit. After you combine the Pico de Gallo ingredients in a bowl, let them sit at room temperate in order for the flavors to meld together.  If you taste it right away, I guarantee you will be disappointed. The salt draws out the flavor from the tomatoes, which we desperately want in this recipe.  Sitting also tones down the raw onion as it mingles with the lime.  Give your Pico de Gallo at least 30 minutes for the magic to happen.
Outside Mexico and Central America, the following salsas are common to each of the following regions; in Argentina and the Southern Cone, chimichurri sauce is common. Chimichurri is "a spicy vinegar-parsley sauce that is the salsa (and leading condiment) in Argentina and Uruguay, served with grilled meat. It is made of chopped fresh parsley and onion, seasoned with garlic, oregano, salt, cayenne chilies and black pepper and bound with oil and vinegar."[3] In Costa Rica, dishes are prepared with salsa Lizano, a thin, smooth, light brown sauce. In Cuba and the Caribbean, a typical salsa is mojo. Unlike the tomato-based salsas, mojo typically consists of olive oil, garlic, and citrus juice, and is used both to marinate meats and as a dipping sauce. In Peru, a traditional salsa is peri peri or piri piri sauce: "The national condiment of Peru, peri-peri sauce is made in medium to hot levels of spiciness—the more chili, or the hotter variety of chile used, the hotter the sauce. Original peri-peri uses the African bird’s eye chili (the Swahili word for the chili is peri-peri). Milder sauces may use only cayenne and serrano chilies. To a base of vinegar and oil, garlic and lemon juice are added, plus other seasonings, which often include paprika or tomato paste for flavor and color, onions and herb—each company has its own recipe. It is also used as a cooking sauce."[4]

By default, this isn’t a very spicy salsa.  I would probably rate it is mild, or possibly medium if you are extra sensitive.  All 3 of my kids have eaten it from the time that they were allowed to start eating chips.  There is a little bit of heat from the ROTEL tomatoes, but it is mellowed by the lime.  You can increase the spiciness of the salsa by adding extra raw jalapeño to it in the first blending step, or by using “Hot” ROTEL tomatoes rather than original.


Whenever I make this, the bowl is always left empty! The idea for a homemade mango sauce hit me after I saw a chef on television make something similar. It sounded so good, and it wasn’t something I could find in a store at the time. The salsa is especially tasty served with artisan chips —the black bean and roasted garlic ones are my favorite. When strawberries are in season, I add them into the mix, too. —Wendy Rusch, Cameron, Wisconsin

I’m a “transplant” from Wisconsin currently living in Texas. Even after 20 years, I can’t get enough of our wonderful local citrus. This is one way to work it into a main dish. The combination of tangy fruit, spicy jalapeno and distinctive cilantro is perfect over any meat, poultry or fish. We also dip into it with chips. —Lois Kildahl, McAllen, Texas

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