Simple, fresh and easy to make. A winning Mexican restaurant style salsa prepared with plum tomatoes, onion cilantro, and serrano peppers. Fresh tomatoes, not canned, star in this recipe. In Mexico, it is known as salsa roja (red sauce) or salsa de mesa (table sauce). And just like in the U.S., it is served in every restaurant before your meal with tortilla chips.
And a very special weekend is here at The Café. A dear friend is coming in from out of town this afternoon and will be spending a few days with us. I’m super excited about her visit, and about the reason for her visit. You see, she’s coming to celebrate! A few other lovely friends are throwing a baby shower for my sweet daughter-in-law, Lindsay. There will be lots of laughter, chattering, catching up, good food and gift-opening as several generations gather to participate in a welcome party for the new baby-to-be!
Whenever I make this, the bowl is always left empty! The idea for a homemade mango sauce hit me after I saw a chef on television make something similar. It sounded so good, and it wasn’t something I could find in a store at the time. The salsa is especially tasty served with artisan chips —the black bean and roasted garlic ones are my favorite. When strawberries are in season, I add them into the mix, too. —Wendy Rusch, Cameron, Wisconsin
I want to share with you my favorite salsa recipe. It has great tomato flavor with the pop of cilantro and just right amount of heat from the serrano chiles. It goes well with chips, carne asada tacos, taquitos, eggs and just about any other dish that you like to add salsa to. You will find a variation of this salsa on tables throughout Mexico. It’s a classic and with good reason.
What’s on your docket for the weekend? Hanging out with family? Watching a ball game? Do you have guests coming? Maybe you’re going to a potluck gathering of friends. Has a new family moved into your neighborhood who might need a special, fresh treat to welcome them? I got you covered on any or all of these fronts with this delicious seasonal salsa.
Outside Mexico and Central America, the following salsas are common to each of the following regions; in Argentina and the Southern Cone, chimichurri sauce is common. Chimichurri is "a spicy vinegar-parsley sauce that is the salsa (and leading condiment) in Argentina and Uruguay, served with grilled meat. It is made of chopped fresh parsley and onion, seasoned with garlic, oregano, salt, cayenne chilies and black pepper and bound with oil and vinegar."[3] In Costa Rica, dishes are prepared with salsa Lizano, a thin, smooth, light brown sauce. In Cuba and the Caribbean, a typical salsa is mojo. Unlike the tomato-based salsas, mojo typically consists of olive oil, garlic, and citrus juice, and is used both to marinate meats and as a dipping sauce. In Peru, a traditional salsa is peri peri or piri piri sauce: "The national condiment of Peru, peri-peri sauce is made in medium to hot levels of spiciness—the more chili, or the hotter variety of chile used, the hotter the sauce. Original peri-peri uses the African bird’s eye chili (the Swahili word for the chili is peri-peri). Milder sauces may use only cayenne and serrano chilies. To a base of vinegar and oil, garlic and lemon juice are added, plus other seasonings, which often include paprika or tomato paste for flavor and color, onions and herb—each company has its own recipe. It is also used as a cooking sauce."[4]
I like to keep a big jar of the homemade salsa in my refrigerator for up to a week. I serve the chips and salsa with quick weeknight dinners like quesadillas or tacos, and Keith loves them as a side with his sandwiches at lunch. The kids even dip veggies in the salsa for afternoon snacks. I’m not exaggerating when I say that this is truly a kitchen staple — whether we’re hosting a party or not!
Hi, Sommer, I was pointed to your blog by Cory Kowalski. I immediately saved your detox soup recipe AND the salsa one. I love salsa and love making it, but I can’t eat as much as I’d like to because I have kidney disease (and tomatoes aren’t good for me). I am going to try making a salsa with an extra dose of tomatilos, substituting them for some of the tomatoes. I’ll let you know how it comes out. BTW, I can’t find a ‘follow’ button on your site — except pointing to Pinterest, which I know nothing about.
OMG this is so good!! I made a batch at 7am for a bbq this afternoon and ate half of it for my breakfast, so had to replenish it with another can of tomatoes (only had a can of chopped tomatoes left, which worked fine, plus another pinch of all the other ingredients… Amazing! Only thing I had to change was using garlic powder as I had no fresh, still fine. Used 1 green chili and half a red, no seeds, perfect! And 1/4 tsp sugar, as I’m not a huge fan of sweetness. Thank you so much, this is my go to Salsa now :)) Going to make your hummus now too!
The Spanish name for this salsa means "rooster's beak," and originally referred to a salad of jicama, peanuts, oranges, and onions. But today, whether you're in Minneapolis or Mexico City, if you ask for pico de gallo, you'll get the familiar cilantro-flecked combination of chopped tomato, onion, and fresh chiles. This tart, crisp condiment (also known as salsa Mexicana) has become so common on Mexican tables that it seems like no coincidence that its colors match those of the national flag. Besides finding firm ripe tomatoes and seeding them, the key to this salsa is adding plenty of lime juice and salt, and not skimping on the chiles. Because without a burst of acidity and heat, you're just eating chopped tomatoes.

¿En qué país se consume más queso por persona? Curiosamente no es en Holanda o en Francia como quizás mucho podríamos pensar. Grecia gana en el ranking con un consumo de unos 27,3 kilos de queso (su queso feta fundamentalmente). Francia es el segundo consumidor de queso del mundo con unos 24 kilos por persona y año y el tercero es Italia con casi 23 kilogramos por persona.
OMG this is so good!! I made a batch at 7am for a bbq this afternoon and ate half of it for my breakfast, so had to replenish it with another can of tomatoes (only had a can of chopped tomatoes left, which worked fine, plus another pinch of all the other ingredients… Amazing! Only thing I had to change was using garlic powder as I had no fresh, still fine. Used 1 green chili and half a red, no seeds, perfect! And 1/4 tsp sugar, as I’m not a huge fan of sweetness. Thank you so much, this is my go to Salsa now :)) Going to make your hummus now too!
Bottom line, pico de gallo is a salsa from Mexico, also known as salsa fresca (fresh salsa), salsa cruda (raw salsa), and salsa huevona (lazy salsa).  It’s traditionally made from chopped fresh tomatoes, onion, chiles (jalapeños or serranos), cilantro, salt and lime juice.  It’s always served chopped, not blended or pureed or mashed.  And it’s used in about a million ways, from sprinkling on tacos and tamales and tostadas, to scooping up with your favorite tortilla chips.
I love cilantro, but this recipe calls for waaay too much of it. I started out with 2 T., then added another, and then another for a total of about 1/4 C. I used fresh cilantro from my garden and maybe that’s more pungent than the store-bought variety. But, had I used the 2/3 C. which the recipe called for I’m sure it would have overwhelmed all the other ingredients. As it is, the 1/4 C. gave the pico a nice cilantro “presence” while still letting all the other wonderful flavors shine through.
Salsa and Queso Recipes are some of our favorite appetizers on the planet! Nothing beats a night of staying in and enjoying EASY Mexican food at home. These Salsa Recipes and Queso Recipes hit all the high notes with none of the fuss. The BEST Salsas and Cheese Dips you’ll ever come across and the only recipes you’ll ever need for game day or Cinco de Mayo!

I made as per the recipe, apart from charring the corn on the gas while I made the patties to give the a little smoke. They were very delicious and tasty, and also quick and easy. I didn't bother with the food processor either. My problem was making the patties to big and too thin, which made them hard to transfer. I also had a wax paper collapse, and landed up having to feed some to a very happy cat! Next time I think I might try cling film, which doesn't dissolve from the meat juices.

Salsa mexicana, also known as salsa fresca, is the reigning condiment of Mexico. It is found on the tables of both fancy restaurants and neighborhood taquerías. For some reason, in many parts of the country, it is also known as pico de gallo, or "roosters beak," a designation also given to a regional specialty of Jalisco composed of pieces of jicama, with cucumber, melon, or pineapple, all sprinkled with ground dried chiles. The commonality seems to be either the sharply cut pieces of ingredients or the sharp tastes.
I’m a “transplant” from Wisconsin currently living in Texas. Even after 20 years, I can’t get enough of our wonderful local citrus. This is one way to work it into a main dish. The combination of tangy fruit, spicy jalapeno and distinctive cilantro is perfect over any meat, poultry or fish. We also dip into it with chips. —Lois Kildahl, McAllen, Texas

This is a fantastic and super simple recipe! I doubled the recipe because I consider salsa to be a food group in and of itself and wanted to have some for a few days. I also doubled the jalapeño as I like more kick. I must disagree with one of the other reviewers in that I found the flavor to be better the second day and still better the day after that! So much so that the next time I make it, I will make it the day before I need it so the flavors can meld overnight.
Douglas, I was just wondering about using the iron skillet or comal and the tomatoes. I tried a different recipe the other day and used my iron skillet to toast the ancho chilies, tomatoes and serrano peppers it called for. After blending all the ingredients, I used the same skillet to heat and cook the finished sauce. I only thought about it after the fact and wondered if the acidic sauce changed in flavor by using the iron skillet. I am sure our grandmothers used their iron for everything and never worried about the acid in them, so I am sure this question is moot, but I still want to know. I am not a very good cook, even though I try, and last weeks sauce did not turn out very tasty. I am going to give this one a try and hope it comes out better. Thank you for posting this.
I did choose canned diced chilies in this recipe only because I wanted a milder salsa with a hint of smokiness, but if you want a spicier salsa, leave out the diced chiles and roast a couple of jalapeños along with the tomatoes. Or you can even use both. Totally up to you! Want to give it a nice kick? Use a habanero, scotch bonnet, or ghost pepper to really crank up the heat.
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