Wow, good article. I am having a party this weekend and this will be perfect. Hey, wanted to let you know that there is another website called Wacai that you should post your article on. It has a lot of similar stuff on it. I know that you can link your website to it and it will give you a list of similar articles. It’s pretty useful, anyways thanks again!
Absolutely wonderful! Just finished making IT! I made it with all fresh ingredients and added some extra little skinny cucumbers! For extra flavor a bit of Heinz Ketchup and Sriracha sauce! My husband just left to pick up some bags of Doritos. We can’t always get the “stuff” we so took for granted in Canada. Thanks so much for this incredible recipe….we both appreciate it!
I'm on the hunt for an out-of-this-world pico de gallo recipe. While this was not it, this will be my go-to base recipe for the time being. Fresh and good. Make sure to drain as much liquid from the tomatoes as possible during seeding and chopping. Let the lime juice and seasonings stand out by eliminating tomato liquid completely. Day 2 the flavor was still good in our case. 

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Pico de Gallo is quick and easy, made with only a handful of ingredients, amazingly fresh and healthy and makes everything taste 1000X better! It's made with just tomatoes, onions, cilantro, jalapenos, lime juice, salt and pepper.  It takes minutes to whip up and is great as a party appetizer, snack with chips, or pile it on your favorite enchiladas, nachos, tacos and more!

The opinions expressed on my blog are based on my own thoughts, knowledge, and experiences and are not intended to be medical advice. I am not a doctor, registered dietitian or licensed nutritionist, so please consult the appropriate health professional before making any changes to your diet, health, or other applicable areas. In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. This helps support my ability to keep on blogging! I affiliate ONLY with companies, products, services and activities I believe in and use personally.

When I was pregnant with my son, I was completely addicted to Chili’s salsa and chips.  I wanted to eat there ALL the time, and even when I wasn’t eating there I was trying to convince my husband to stop there on his way home to pick up some take out lol.  He was always less than pleased.  I still love their salsa, but since it’s not really cost effective to buy it, or go out to eat all the time, I figured that I would just find a way to make it at home 🙂
While using a food processor is completely optional, it is recommended. It's the easiest and fastest way to blend all of the ingredients together. A blender can work as well, but I would recommend either working in batches or stopping to stir a few times, so that the bottom doesn't become pure liquid! Chopping all of your vegetables by hand would take a bit of time, but you can do that for more of a pico de gallo–style salsa, if you prefer! 
I made a version of this, but I winged it, strictly from experience (tasting, not making). I used two roma tomatoes, half a sweet onion, one large jalapeno (veined/seeded), half cup cilantro, one whole lime, and a large pinch of salt. I was sure I did something wrong, but it was very good anyway. Finding this recipe was perfect for me since I did the same thing, just different proportions. I’ll do it right next time! But without the heat, a jalapeno is just a green bell pepper.

Hi Sara! The oil free part is hard, I haven’t found any oil free. But the unsalted and whole grain is pretty much most of the tortilla chips I’ve seen! Many have unsalted versions. For me, as long as they have very few ingredients (corn, lime, oil is the basics) I’m good. We sometimes do unsalted because we don’t eat tons of salt but there are brands with less salt use than others. Cadia makes some great ones!
The addition of fresh onions give this pico de gallo recipe the perfect zing, and the lime helps add freshness while jalapenos add the perfect bit of heat. If you aren’t a big fan of spice be sure to remove all of the membranes and seeds from your jalapenos! This recipe tastes best after it sits for about 20-30 minutes, so the flavors can really blend!
This is the BEST salsa! The Verde is great too. I didn’t habe Serranos so used jalapenos. Salsa wasn’t “right” so sent son to store, added Serranos. Perfection! Note i use both peppers in recipe. When people come in and see tomatillos on counter they get very happy! This recipe had enhanced our lives bc it’s great. Freezes well and i can use non gmo organic ingredients. Thank you.

I'm on the hunt for an out-of-this-world pico de gallo recipe. While this was not it, this will be my go-to base recipe for the time being. Fresh and good. Make sure to drain as much liquid from the tomatoes as possible during seeding and chopping. Let the lime juice and seasonings stand out by eliminating tomato liquid completely. Day 2 the flavor was still good in our case.
Had some tomatoes from the Albuquerque grower’s market at their peak (and perhaps a tad beyond). Made the recipe as written except for an extra 3rd serrano (seeds, ribs, and all), 3 large and very fresh garlic cloves, and one chipotle en adobo. It’s cooling in the pan on the stove as I write, but I can already tell this is my new “signature” salsa. Hot diggity!
I was really nervous about this recipe I searched and searched and searched this is the one I decided to do. There were a lot of reviews but most of them said all looks good all got to try this I wish they would only post if they did make it there was a couple that said it was fantastic taste was good so I chose this one. This recipe is amazing if you want restaurant style salsa you need to try this one in my portion I put one Serrano No Seeds no ribs in everybody else’s portion to whole Serrano’s. You have to try this recipe it is truly truly truly amazing and so delicious
Hi Sara! The oil free part is hard, I haven’t found any oil free. But the unsalted and whole grain is pretty much most of the tortilla chips I’ve seen! Many have unsalted versions. For me, as long as they have very few ingredients (corn, lime, oil is the basics) I’m good. We sometimes do unsalted because we don’t eat tons of salt but there are brands with less salt use than others. Cadia makes some great ones!
As I mentioned above, I picked up the Missions Organics Tortilla Chips and all of the ingredients for my homemade salsa at my local Kroger in Charlottesville. You can use the store locator to find the chips in your area, and be sure to check out the additional recipe ideas as well. They’ve got Tequila Guacamole and Cheese Nachos as well as Chimichurri Steak Tacos! Oh my YUM.
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More…
If salsa isn’t your thing, it’s other half, guacamole, is always an option. We think it should count as its own food group, but that’s another story. If you’re wanting some guac recipes that’ll hit just as hard as Chipotle’s, scoot on over here and check out Food Network’s Alton Brown’s guacamole recipe or better yet, any of the recipes they have for the velvety goodness that is the avocado.
Great dish!  I got rave reviews from my family when cooking this for a special holiday dinner. Simple!  I had 5 lbs instead of 4 lbs of robs so they needed about 10 minutes more cooking time. I used a meat thermometer and let the temp rise to 130 degrees F before removing to get to med rare. Be sure to not hit a bone when taking the temp!  One other thing, tent the meat with aluminum foil while resting the meat after the oven.  Serve on a hot plate (I just microwave mine).  :)
Outside Mexico and Central America, the following salsas are common to each of the following regions; in Argentina and the Southern Cone, chimichurri sauce is common. Chimichurri is "a spicy vinegar-parsley sauce that is the salsa (and leading condiment) in Argentina and Uruguay, served with grilled meat. It is made of chopped fresh parsley and onion, seasoned with garlic, oregano, salt, cayenne chilies and black pepper and bound with oil and vinegar."[3] In Costa Rica, dishes are prepared with salsa Lizano, a thin, smooth, light brown sauce. In Cuba and the Caribbean, a typical salsa is mojo. Unlike the tomato-based salsas, mojo typically consists of olive oil, garlic, and citrus juice, and is used both to marinate meats and as a dipping sauce. In Peru, a traditional salsa is peri peri or piri piri sauce: "The national condiment of Peru, peri-peri sauce is made in medium to hot levels of spiciness—the more chili, or the hotter variety of chile used, the hotter the sauce. Original peri-peri uses the African bird’s eye chili (the Swahili word for the chili is peri-peri). Milder sauces may use only cayenne and serrano chilies. To a base of vinegar and oil, garlic and lemon juice are added, plus other seasonings, which often include paprika or tomato paste for flavor and color, onions and herb—each company has its own recipe. It is also used as a cooking sauce."[4]
I had save this recipe cause I knew it would be good, and it proved to be the best one I’ve ever made. My ratios of spices and peppers were a little altered, and I had a can of Muir Glen fire roasted, crushed tomatoes which added a little more depth perhaps, but it’s a big winner. I filed this in “Make Again” for sure! Thank you – love your emails.
Devein jalapenos. The ribs and seeds carry the most heat in peppers, so we are going to remove them but you can always add in some seeds later.  To seed and devein your jalapeno(s), cut the stem off then cut the jalapeño in half lengthwise.  Scoop out the seeds with a spoon or pairing knife.  If there is still white rib remaining in some places, then slice it out.

I really believe that salsa is best when only a few key ingredients are involved. While there are so many recipes for this dip, literally millions and some with dozens of ingredients, I still believe in my mantra: simple is always best. This recipe is the perfect accompaniment for quesadillas, fajitas, taquitos, or served beside some homemade guac. You name it!
Rub one 16x12" piece of parchment with a little bit of oil. Place 1 ball of meat on one half of oiled paper, then fold other half over. Using a rolling pin or wine bottle, gently roll meat into a very thin oval between parchment (it should be about 9x6"). Transfer, with parchment, to a rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with 3 more sheets of paper and remaining meat. Chill until ready to use.
The main characters in this flavorful salsa are sweet, juicy navel oranges and creamy, crowd-pleasing avocados. I zested the oranges before sectioning them adding an extra layer of citrus delight. Sweet onion, cherry tomatoes, seedless cucumbers and finely chopped jalapeño complete the cast. Of course a generous helping of chopped cilantro adds a fresh zip to any salsa, but if you’re not a fan, a shower of finely chopped fresh basil will work just as well.
Tomatoes. Choose deeply colored, firm with-with-a-little-give, ripe tomatoes for maximum flavor because this recipe centers around the tomatoes.  We want ripe for flavor but not too ripe or they will get mushy and fall apart.  Also, make sure they smell like a tomato – if they don’t smell then they will taste like cardboard.  You can use plum tomatoes, but I prefer Roma tomatoes because they have fewer seeds to scoop out.
We’ve been making this delicious Corn and Black Bean Salsa for years whenever we are having friends over, or when we are heading out to a friend’s house for a cookout. It’s a great dip / appetizer to have with Mexican themed dinners, for taco night and just to have as a crowd pleasing snack. The great thing about this recipe is that it is super easy to make. It’s about 1/2 canned goods and 1/2 fresh ingredients, and it literally only takes a few minutes to put together.

Living in Carlsbad (Southern California), we go out to Mexican food a LOT.  No matter what I order, I ensure there is a big pile of fresh Pico de Gallo on my plate.  It’s a staple at every Mexican restaurant and at every Mexican table for a reason. It simply doesn’t get much easier or more freshly delicious than Pico de Gallo.  It adds a punch of vibrant flavor to every dish or is just as delicious scooped up by a chip.   So to make every Mexican dish you serve better and in preparation of my Al Pastor Tacos coming later this week (below – eeek!  so excited to share!), I thought it high time I brought you this easyPico de Gallo recipe.


@Carl. My wife is Mexican and I’ve traveled there many times; particularly the state of Michoacán where she’s from. In Mexico, the sauce that you make is called a “Salsa Cruda” (Raw Sauce). It is perfectly fine to make it without frying/simmering since it’s just one of the MANY ways to make a sauce in the Mexican kitchen. I must say that adding cumin to a sauce is more typical of Tex Mex than the authentic Mexican style sauce. Also, lime is only added to something such as pico de gallo. Salsa verde is another sauce that made by cooking tomatillos, jalapeños and a couple garlic cloves in slightly boiling water for about 10 min. Once the tomatillos are cooked, you add them with a little bit of the cooking water, the chilies, garlic, a piece of white onion, cilantro and salt to a food processor. This is carefully processed due to the hot liquid. Tomatillos can be pretty acidic so a pinch of sugar can be added to counter that. I’ve been in a ranch in Michoacán where they cooked a goat over a wood fire. I saw them make the “birria” (typical Mexican sauce for roasted meats) over the same wood fire. It picked up the smoke taste and I’ll tell you, it was the best BBQ goat that I EVER had!
First and foremost, like any salsa, this one is a crowd-pleasing party dip. But that’s just one of the many hats it wears. On nights you don’t feel like cooking (or it’s simply too hot), spoon this hearty salsa into a soft tortilla, top with a dollop of Greek yogurt and guac, and you’ve got a no-muss, no-fuss meal on your hands. Beyond that, spoon it over grilled chicken, fish, or pork chops, or make it the star of your next burrito bowl.
One thing though, I have never heard of simmering it. I switch up making mine to where I add all ingredients into a food processor and process until well mixed and chopped and then serve, or I only place the tomatoes and spices in the food processor and process until well chopped and then add the finely chopped onions, jalapenos and cilantro and then mix manually until all is well mixed. This makes for a chunkier salsa, and again I serve immediately.
Oh it definitely counts as one of the five 😉 Thank you so much! Hmmm, no raw onions is a tough one but here is my suggestion: I’d try sautéing them a little, almost until they brown but not completely. Then for the tomatoes try roasting some yourself in the oven. That way you still get both the fresh and roasted feel. You can roast them with the garlic if you’re using the roasted garlic instead of the fresh. Let me know how it turns out! It’ll be a new trial!
First and foremost, like any salsa, this one is a crowd-pleasing party dip. But that’s just one of the many hats it wears. On nights you don’t feel like cooking (or it’s simply too hot), spoon this hearty salsa into a soft tortilla, top with a dollop of Greek yogurt and guac, and you’ve got a no-muss, no-fuss meal on your hands. Beyond that, spoon it over grilled chicken, fish, or pork chops, or make it the star of your next burrito bowl.
Whenever I make this, the bowl is always left empty! The idea for a homemade mango sauce hit me after I saw a chef on television make something similar. It sounded so good, and it wasn’t something I could find in a store at the time. The salsa is especially tasty served with artisan chips —the black bean and roasted garlic ones are my favorite. When strawberries are in season, I add them into the mix, too. —Wendy Rusch, Cameron, Wisconsin

Congrats and Semper Fi!!! From a Marine Daughter, Mother, and Mother-in-law… You Really do have reason to be proud as I can tell you are. I had my Son’s Boot Camp Graduation party instead of a High School Graduation party (my son graduated early to go in on Memorial Day 7 years ago. If you would like to touch base on anything. Marine Mom to Marine Mom feel free. Tell your son Ooh Rah!! from my family and myself. Oh and I love Mexican food too. The Pico was wonderful and will be making again. Congrats again and welcome the the Marine Family!!


Rub one 16x12" piece of parchment with a little bit of oil. Place 1 ball of meat on one half of oiled paper, then fold other half over. Using a rolling pin or wine bottle, gently roll meat into a very thin oval between parchment (it should be about 9x6"). Transfer, with parchment, to a rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with 3 more sheets of paper and remaining meat. Chill until ready to use.
Whenever I make this, the bowl is always left empty! The idea for a homemade mango sauce hit me after I saw a chef on television make something similar. It sounded so good, and it wasn’t something I could find in a store at the time. The salsa is especially tasty served with artisan chips —the black bean and roasted garlic ones are my favorite. When strawberries are in season, I add them into the mix, too. —Wendy Rusch, Cameron, Wisconsin
The opinions expressed on my blog are based on my own thoughts, knowledge, and experiences and are not intended to be medical advice. I am not a doctor, registered dietitian or licensed nutritionist, so please consult the appropriate health professional before making any changes to your diet, health, or other applicable areas. In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. This helps support my ability to keep on blogging! I affiliate ONLY with companies, products, services and activities I believe in and use personally.
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