Great dish!  I got rave reviews from my family when cooking this for a special holiday dinner. Simple!  I had 5 lbs instead of 4 lbs of robs so they needed about 10 minutes more cooking time. I used a meat thermometer and let the temp rise to 130 degrees F before removing to get to med rare. Be sure to not hit a bone when taking the temp!  One other thing, tent the meat with aluminum foil while resting the meat after the oven.  Serve on a hot plate (I just microwave mine).  :)
It’s all in the tomatoes… or more accurately, in how you prepare them! When making homemade Pico De Gallo, I prefer to core and remove the seeds from the tomatoes to keep the salsa from getting soupy. The salt will continue to draw out the natural juices from the tomatoes, so you’ll always end up with a juicier Pico De Gallo than when you started. If you were to keep the juiciest parts of the tomatoes, add lime juice and add the salt which will draw out even more juices, you’ll end up with a much more watery salsa than intended. It’ll still be delicious and enjoyable, just not quite the right consistency.
Mexican food has the reputation for being heavy and greasy, unjustly deserved in my opinion. This dish is the complete opposite. All vegetables, low calories, and no fat. Totally guilt-free. Eat with reckless abandon. It is vegetarian and vegan to boot. Kids will eat it too because it is “salsa”, not yucky vegetables and it works just as well with fussy adults who don’t like vegetables.
Hi Mary Ann 🙂 We love cilantro, so I’ve never made this salsa without it. Most salsas actually have some cilantro in it, but if you hate the taste, you could substitute a bit of fresh parsley, or eliminate the cilantro altogether. I can’t guarantee the taste though, since my recipe uses cilantro as a big ingredient. The scoops method you mentioned sounds yummy!
Living in Carlsbad (Southern California), we go out to Mexican food a LOT.  No matter what I order, I ensure there is a big pile of fresh Pico de Gallo on my plate.  It’s a staple at every Mexican restaurant and at every Mexican table for a reason. It simply doesn’t get much easier or more freshly delicious than Pico de Gallo.  It adds a punch of vibrant flavor to every dish or is just as delicious scooped up by a chip.   So to make every Mexican dish you serve better and in preparation of my Al Pastor Tacos coming later this week (below – eeek!  so excited to share!), I thought it high time I brought you this easyPico de Gallo recipe.

¿Como la elaboramos? Cortamos el queso en trozos (podemos utilizar diferentes tipos de queso, para hacer una salsa más especial y propia), lo ponemos sobre el bol o taza y le echamos una cucharada de leche (se utiliza para que no se solidifique el queso), un poco más si el queso que utilizamos es más seco. Lo metemos al microondas hasta que derrita y voilà cést fini, listo para servir.

“From Rick Bayless, 'Authentic Mexican.' If you're looking for an authentic Mexican salsa, this is it! It's so simple too! I only use one onion and two jalapenos when I make it, but I decided I'd post the original recipe instead of altering it. The way I make it produces a medium heat. I'd imagine making it his way would produce a hot salsa. I really like it with the lime juice. I haven't made it with the vinegar yet.”
The Engine 2 Diet has sold hundreds of thousands of copies and inspired a plant-based food revolution. Featuring endorsements from top medical experts and a food line in Whole Foods Market, Engine 2 is the most trusted name in plant-based eating. Now, readers can bring the Engine 2 program into their kitchens with this cookbook companion to the original diet program. Engine 2 started in a firehouse in Texas, and if Texas firefighters love to eat this food, readers nationwide will eat it up, too! THE ENGINE 2 COOKBOOK packs the life-saving promise of the Engine 2 program into more than 130 mouth-watering, crowd-pleasing recipes that are designed to help readers lose weight, lower cholesterol, and improve their health, one delicious bite at a time.
This looks INCREDIBLE!! I also judge Mexican restaurants on the quality of their salsa. I became ADDICTED to chips and salsa when my son was first eating solids. Since there is little time to eat when caring for an infant, I would be feeing him with one hand and snacking on chips and salsa with the other. It is now my go-to when I’m having a snack craving!
karinagw, thank you for the glowing report! We also enjoy salsa with a little more texture. Next time you can add more peppers for extra spice. We have several friends who don't enjoy the flavor of cilantro, either. One says it tastes like dirt! So we have experimented with cilantro-less salsa and found a little lime rounds on the flavors. Thanks again for your feedback. Have a great week.

Vamos a cocinarla a fuego medio hasta que se poche y se dore un poco, para lo que iremos removiendo de vez en cuando para que no se nos pegue. Cuando esté blandita la cebolla vamos a echar un poco de pimienta negra recién molida e iremos agregando los cuatro tipos de quesos troceados, para que se vayan fundiendo más fácilmente. Lo hacemos a fuego medio-suave, para que se vayan mezclando poco a poco y no se nos quemen.
Cuela la salsa si tiene trozos de condimentos. Si la salsa tiene trocitos, retira parte de los condimentos con una cuchara pequeña. En este punto, el sabor de los condimentos ya estará incorporado. Otra alternativa es colocar un colador sobre una olla mediana y cubrir el colador con un paño de queso. Verifica que el paño sea lo bastante largo para cubrir por completo la superficie del colador y que cuelgue sobre sus bordes. Luego, vierte con suavidad el queso sobre el colador.[11]
Cinco de Mayo is this Thursday. You haven’t even prepared for the party you’re attending. You’re supposed to make that thing you said you would. What was it, oh yeah, salsa. Rachel was counting on you. You promised. You scour the internet for a recipe. This one on D.R. Horton’s blog pops up. You think, “How could I mess this up?” It gets made. It’s delicious. You arrive at the party, salsa in hand. You realize you brought the party. Everyone loves it. You’re humbled. You reward yourself with a margarita. Okay, maybe two margaritas.

I like to keep a big jar of the homemade salsa in my refrigerator for up to a week. I serve the chips and salsa with quick weeknight dinners like quesadillas or tacos, and Keith loves them as a side with his sandwiches at lunch. The kids even dip veggies in the salsa for afternoon snacks. I’m not exaggerating when I say that this is truly a kitchen staple — whether we’re hosting a party or not!

Rub one 16x12" piece of parchment with a little bit of oil. Place 1 ball of meat on one half of oiled paper, then fold other half over. Using a rolling pin or wine bottle, gently roll meat into a very thin oval between parchment (it should be about 9x6"). Transfer, with parchment, to a rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with 3 more sheets of paper and remaining meat. Chill until ready to use.
¿Como la elaboramos? Cortamos el queso en trozos (podemos utilizar diferentes tipos de queso, para hacer una salsa más especial y propia), lo ponemos sobre el bol o taza y le echamos una cucharada de leche (se utiliza para que no se solidifique el queso), un poco más si el queso que utilizamos es más seco. Lo metemos al microondas hasta que derrita y voilà cést fini, listo para servir.

Serve slightly chilled or at room temperature. If you serve it really cold it tastes flat. The subtle flavor of the ingredients doesn’t shine through. If you are not convinced, do a taste test. Eat a batch that is ice cold and then eat batch that is at room temperature. You will see the difference. I guarantee it. Pico de gallo is best when eaten fresh.
Canned tomatoes are typically picked at their peak ripeness, which means they will be more flavorful and sweet. They are then processed within hours of being harvested to maintain the best flavor. There are different types of canned tomato products, however, diced or whole for salsas will achieve the proper consistency. Fresh tomatoes can be used in combination to add texture, however, they are much more watery since they have not be cooked to release some of the moisture. They are however excellent for chunkier dips like pico de gallo.
Oh it definitely counts as one of the five 😉 Thank you so much! Hmmm, no raw onions is a tough one but here is my suggestion: I’d try sautéing them a little, almost until they brown but not completely. Then for the tomatoes try roasting some yourself in the oven. That way you still get both the fresh and roasted feel. You can roast them with the garlic if you’re using the roasted garlic instead of the fresh. Let me know how it turns out! It’ll be a new trial!

I really believe that salsa is best when only a few key ingredients are involved. While there are so many recipes for this dip, literally millions and some with dozens of ingredients, I still believe in my mantra: simple is always best. This recipe is the perfect accompaniment for quesadillas, fajitas, taquitos, or served beside some homemade guac. You name it!
Probablemente desde hace miles de años. Hay varias leyendas que cuentan que el primer queso se pudo crear por accidente, al transportarse leche en alforjas creadas con el estómago de animales como las ovejas. La leche se cuajó y de ahí surgió el queso. Otra teoría especula que la leche se pudo cuajar al rociar la leche con ácidos como el zumo de frutas.
Made this yesterday w/my sister & we served it to our husbands & they thought it was the best ever! We all couldn’ Stop eating it!! Also so easy to make. I added a step. If you like salsa w/o tomato skins, just slice in half & lay face down on sheet pan w/parchment paper. In oven on broil about 5 minutes, the skins wrinkle right up & pull off easily!
So when it comes to salsa, I think we are all in agreement that the one with avocados is pretty much always the winner, but a pair or trio of dips never hurt anybody. If you’re hosting a fajita night, check out these other easy Mexican dip recipes perfect for entertaining: crockpot taco queso, fresh salsa, and authentic guacamole would all look lovely next to a bowl of your creamy tomatillo avocado salsa! Please, enjoy!

Made this today with my remaining garden tomatoes, roasting the tomatoes, garlic, and onions as directed. Within just a few seconds of pulsing in the food processor, the mixture turned to complete soup. I mean, there was just no salvaging a salsa type of consistency out of it. The spices are nice and I’m going to use it to make a cream of tomato soup tomorrow, but wanted to warn others who may be really needing a salsa end product. And maybe you have some tips for ensuring this doesn’t happen?
It’s easy to make either a coarse salsa with just a knife and chopping board - alternatively, for a smooth salsa, whizz the ingredients in a food processor. Serve salsa with tortilla chips and dips such as guacamole or soured cream, or use it as a sauce or for topping pasta or pizza. Fruit salsas made with mango or pineapple go well with grilled fish or chicken.

I did choose canned diced chilies in this recipe only because I wanted a milder salsa with a hint of smokiness, but if you want a spicier salsa, leave out the diced chiles and roast a couple of jalapeños along with the tomatoes. Or you can even use both. Totally up to you! Want to give it a nice kick? Use a habanero, scotch bonnet, or ghost pepper to really crank up the heat.

Hi, Sommer, I was pointed to your blog by Cory Kowalski. I immediately saved your detox soup recipe AND the salsa one. I love salsa and love making it, but I can’t eat as much as I’d like to because I have kidney disease (and tomatoes aren’t good for me). I am going to try making a salsa with an extra dose of tomatilos, substituting them for some of the tomatoes. I’ll let you know how it comes out. BTW, I can’t find a ‘follow’ button on your site — except pointing to Pinterest, which I know nothing about.


If there was ever a time to keep tortilla chips stocked in your pantry, it’s now. When tossed with lime juice, spicy chipotles, and fresh cilantro, a humble can of black beans and an ear of fresh summer corn are transformed into a bold, full-flavored salsa you’ll want to eat with everything. It’s both a crowd-pleasing dip and the base of a no-cook summer supper.
Texas is known for its Tex Mex cuisine, and it just so happens to be one of my favorite things about my native state. If you’ve never made it down to these parts, allow me to paint you a picture: You walk into a restaurant. Nothing too fancy, but the smell immediately seduces every last one of your taste buds. You’ll take a quick glance around, and you can’t help but notice there are baskets of warm, paper-thin tortilla chips on every table, accompanied by salsa.
It’s all in the tomatoes… or more accurately, in how you prepare them! When making homemade Pico De Gallo, I prefer to core and remove the seeds from the tomatoes to keep the salsa from getting soupy. The salt will continue to draw out the natural juices from the tomatoes, so you’ll always end up with a juicier Pico De Gallo than when you started. If you were to keep the juiciest parts of the tomatoes, add lime juice and add the salt which will draw out even more juices, you’ll end up with a much more watery salsa than intended. It’ll still be delicious and enjoyable, just not quite the right consistency.
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