This is pico de gallo, also called salsa fresca. This is not what most people in the States think of when they think of salsa. The salsa you find at Mexican restaurants and the like is usually a salsa roja, which has very similar ingredients, but is usually pureed and is often made by first roasting the vegetables both to bring out their flavors as well as to get them to the desired texture. Many people make it with canned tomatoes as well, which are also cooked, resulting in the kind of "mouth feel" one expects with this kind of a salsa. In short, the title of this recipe "Mexican Salsa" is very misleading and should really be changed, possibly to "Salsa Fresca" if not just calling it pico de gallo.
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Made this recipe with my son (10yr old) on a rainy cold Saturday. What a success! Showing him some knife skills, taught him to use a can opener. Told stories. Substituted some of the tomato for a handful of tomatillos so I could teach him to blanch. Finally an hour or so away from technology to just talk with my son. Salsa turned out absolutely incredible btw. Thanks


Para comenzar hay que pelar la cebolla y picarla en trocitos bien pequeños, aunque si te gusta dejarla picada en trozos más grandes para apreciarlos mejor al ahora de comer la salsa, puedes hacerlo, siempre hazlo a tu gusto. Al acabar vamos a poner a derretir la mantequilla con un chorrito de aceite de oliva virgen en una sartén o cacerola de buen tamaño, y cuando esté fundida agregamos la cebolla y echamos sal por encima.
Made this recipe with my son (10yr old) on a rainy cold Saturday. What a success! Showing him some knife skills, taught him to use a can opener. Told stories. Substituted some of the tomato for a handful of tomatillos so I could teach him to blanch. Finally an hour or so away from technology to just talk with my son. Salsa turned out absolutely incredible btw. Thanks
I came across this easy and tasty snack while searching online for healthy munchies for kids. Great for after school, it’s really quick to make and filling enough to hold the kids until dinner. To satisfy heftier appetites or to serve as a power lunch, cut each tortilla into fewer pieces or provide one per child. The recipe is easy to increase as needed. —Mary Haluch, Ludlow, Massachusetts
Douglas, I was just wondering about using the iron skillet or comal and the tomatoes. I tried a different recipe the other day and used my iron skillet to toast the ancho chilies, tomatoes and serrano peppers it called for. After blending all the ingredients, I used the same skillet to heat and cook the finished sauce. I only thought about it after the fact and wondered if the acidic sauce changed in flavor by using the iron skillet. I am sure our grandmothers used their iron for everything and never worried about the acid in them, so I am sure this question is moot, but I still want to know. I am not a very good cook, even though I try, and last weeks sauce did not turn out very tasty. I am going to give this one a try and hope it comes out better. Thank you for posting this.
Now, this is how seriously easy this salsa is to make, folks: The avocados? They don’t even have to be chopped. Just quarter them and throw those suckers in your blender (well, skin and seed removed, of course), along with some quartered tomatillos, half of a roughly chopped onion and garlic clove, along with a few cilantro leaves for flavor, and a roughly chopped jalapeno for a little heat.
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Salsa IS its own food group. Or at least it should be and while we’re at that we could decide it counts as one of your five a day, too ;). I eat salsa every day yet sadly can’t find my favourite organic brand [and there actually is only one brand and kind of organic salsa available in anyway] anymore living in the countryside now. The only ones available contain sugar and even though it’s not a ton I don’t like the fact. At least my dippers are vegetables.
Para comenzar hay que pelar la cebolla y picarla en trocitos bien pequeños, aunque si te gusta dejarla picada en trozos más grandes para apreciarlos mejor al ahora de comer la salsa, puedes hacerlo, siempre hazlo a tu gusto. Al acabar vamos a poner a derretir la mantequilla con un chorrito de aceite de oliva virgen en una sartén o cacerola de buen tamaño, y cuando esté fundida agregamos la cebolla y echamos sal por encima.
You can easily make enough to feed a large crowd or have some extra to freeze so that you can have it on hand any time the chips and salsa craving hits or company stops by.  You can also cut the recipe in half for a personal sized little batch of salsa.  You won’t want to more than double the recipe because generally the blender or food processor won’t be big enough.
Made this recipe with my son (10yr old) on a rainy cold Saturday. What a success! Showing him some knife skills, taught him to use a can opener. Told stories. Substituted some of the tomato for a handful of tomatillos so I could teach him to blanch. Finally an hour or so away from technology to just talk with my son. Salsa turned out absolutely incredible btw. Thanks 

Bottom line, pico de gallo is a salsa from Mexico, also known as salsa fresca (fresh salsa), salsa cruda (raw salsa), and salsa huevona (lazy salsa).  It’s traditionally made from chopped fresh tomatoes, onion, chiles (jalapeños or serranos), cilantro, salt and lime juice.  It’s always served chopped, not blended or pureed or mashed.  And it’s used in about a million ways, from sprinkling on tacos and tamales and tostadas, to scooping up with your favorite tortilla chips.
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