Arrange the tortillas in a stack and cut into 6 equal wedges. Pour about 1-inch of oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat to 350 degrees F on a deep-fat frying thermometer. Fry just a few at a time, turning occasionally, until crisp and lightly browned, about 1 minute. Drain on paper towels; sprinkle lightly with salt, if desired. Store in an airtight container.
Had some tomatoes from the Albuquerque grower’s market at their peak (and perhaps a tad beyond). Made the recipe as written except for an extra 3rd serrano (seeds, ribs, and all), 3 large and very fresh garlic cloves, and one chipotle en adobo. It’s cooling in the pan on the stove as I write, but I can already tell this is my new “signature” salsa. Hot diggity!
While some people may choose to make their homemade salsa with fresh tomatoes only (I used to be one of them) I’ve actually come around to believe that canned tomatoes are your better option for restaurant-style salsa. Because canned tomatoes are picked at the height of tomato season and canned with a high-heat technique to preserve the flavor, canned tomatoes will often taste fresher than the out-of-season tomatoes that you can buy year ’round at the grocery store. That means 11 months out of the year (in most regions) canned tomatoes will actually taste fresher.
Here at Delish, we are firm believers that everything tastes better after it's been roasted (hello, brussels sprouts!), and that's why we opted to roast a few of our salsa ingredients. It brings out the flavors of the jalapeños and deeply sweeten the cherry tomatoes. It takes away some of the pungency of the onion and gives it a more caramelized flavor. This is what will make your salsa stand out above all the rest. 
I really believe that salsa is best when only a few key ingredients are involved. While there are so many recipes for this dip, literally millions and some with dozens of ingredients, I still believe in my mantra: simple is always best. This recipe is the perfect accompaniment for quesadillas, fajitas, taquitos, or served beside some homemade guac. You name it!

Making this right this very second. Following exactly to start with..except am throwing in a couple of Thai peppers along with the 4 smallish jalapenos...which I may regret...them things are supposed to be killer hot. I will say, that it is taking significantly longer than the 10 minutes prep time for the water to simmer off (step 2), but I'm in no huge hurry....I have wine.
Rub one 16x12" piece of parchment with a little bit of oil. Place 1 ball of meat on one half of oiled paper, then fold other half over. Using a rolling pin or wine bottle, gently roll meat into a very thin oval between parchment (it should be about 9x6"). Transfer, with parchment, to a rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with 3 more sheets of paper and remaining meat. Chill until ready to use.
Douglas, I was just wondering about using the iron skillet or comal and the tomatoes. I tried a different recipe the other day and used my iron skillet to toast the ancho chilies, tomatoes and serrano peppers it called for. After blending all the ingredients, I used the same skillet to heat and cook the finished sauce. I only thought about it after the fact and wondered if the acidic sauce changed in flavor by using the iron skillet. I am sure our grandmothers used their iron for everything and never worried about the acid in them, so I am sure this question is moot, but I still want to know. I am not a very good cook, even though I try, and last weeks sauce did not turn out very tasty. I am going to give this one a try and hope it comes out better. Thank you for posting this.

La salsa de tres quesos, tiene una textura suave y un sabor fuerte perfecto para acompañar pastas como los ñoquis de patata, raviolis caseros o cualquier pasta fresca. Los quesos que se utilicen pueden variar según su preferencia otra opciones son, queso azul o camembert. Y también podemos refrigerar la salsa para obtener una pasta de queso para untar panecillos deliciosa.
THANK YOU so much for what your families are sacrificing. So few people hear the calling to serve our country, and I respect what your children are doing for all of us in today’s world. I am a medically retired vet from the AF, but we all know Marines are top-notch. I can’t express my gratitude enough. Aimee, I know it has been a few years, but I truly hope your son was able to find his place in such an extreme environment as the Marines are placed in. How brave all of you are.
Salsa IS its own food group. Or at least it should be and while we’re at that we could decide it counts as one of your five a day, too ;). I eat salsa every day yet sadly can’t find my favourite organic brand [and there actually is only one brand and kind of organic salsa available in anyway] anymore living in the countryside now. The only ones available contain sugar and even though it’s not a ton I don’t like the fact. At least my dippers are vegetables.
Where does nutrition info come from? Nutrition facts are provided as a courtesy, sourced from the USDA Food Database. You can find individual ingredient carb counts we use in the Low Carb & Keto Food List. Carb count excludes sugar alcohols. Net carb count excludes both fiber and sugar alcohols, because these do not affect blood sugar in most people. We try to be accurate, but feel free to make your own calculations.

Salsa is any one of several sauces typical of Mexican cuisine, also known as salsa fresca, hot salsa or salsa picante, particularly those used as dips. Salsa is often tomato-based, and includes ingredients such as onions, chilies, an acid and herbs. It is typically piquant, ranging from mild to extremely hot. Though many different sauce preparations are called salsa in Spanish, in English, it generally refers to raw or near-raw sauces used as dips.
×