If there was ever a time to keep tortilla chips stocked in your pantry, it’s now. When tossed with lime juice, spicy chipotles, and fresh cilantro, a humble can of black beans and an ear of fresh summer corn are transformed into a bold, full-flavored salsa you’ll want to eat with everything. It’s both a crowd-pleasing dip and the base of a no-cook summer supper.
Pico De Gallo is a type of chunky fresh salsa that’s simple to throw together and is ready in just a few minutes. With just a little chopping and a few minutes of your time, you’ll have an amazingly flavorful salsa to add tons of flavor to your meals. This Pico De Gallo recipe is a great appetizer that you can serve with tortilla chips, or use it to liven up the flavor of easy dinners like taco soup recipe, homemade burrito bowls, tacos, or rice and beans.
Had some tomatoes from the Albuquerque grower’s market at their peak (and perhaps a tad beyond). Made the recipe as written except for an extra 3rd serrano (seeds, ribs, and all), 3 large and very fresh garlic cloves, and one chipotle en adobo. It’s cooling in the pan on the stove as I write, but I can already tell this is my new “signature” salsa. Hot diggity!
This homemade salsa recipe is pretty basic.  There are lots of recipes out there and lots of great recipes.  Why this one is my trusty go to recipe that I have used most of my life, is the combination of being entirely delicious, but yet still so easy to make!  With the use of some fresh ingredients and some canned you are able to trick your mouth into thinking this recipe took 10 hours of hard labor peeling tomatoes to make, when really I was able to whip up a batch of the homemade salsa in as little as 10 minutes!
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If you’re making a pureed salsa and it’s too thin or watery for your liking try adding a cornstarch slurry: for each cup of salsa you want to thicken add 1 tbsp of cornstarch to a seperate bowl. Then add and equal amount of water to the separate bowl. (If you addes 3 tbsp cornstarch then add 3 tbsp water) stir until it forms a paste. Put your salsa in a saucepan. Once it is simmering add the cornstarch slurry to the salsa and stir. (This will not work if the salsa is cold)
* ~ Can be prepared several hours in advance. Combine lime juice, honey, cumin, garlic and sea salt in a small glass jar. Cover, shake well and refrigerate. Cut up other ingredients except the avocado and keep in separate containers in the refrigerator. Combine just before serving, draining oranges and tomatoes well before adding. Peel and dice avocado. Add avocado to orange mixture and gently stir to combine.
The recipe I'm sharing today is a simplified version of a roasted salsa that I normally make the "long" way--firing up the grill and roasting the chiles, and oven roasting fresh tomatoes, garlic and onions. When tomatoes and chiles are abundant in the farmer's markets in the summer, I can enough salsa to get us through the fall and winter. If you're interested in making roasted salsa from scratch with all fresh ingredients, here's that recipe. That post and recipe include canning instructions, too.
Rub one 16x12" piece of parchment with a little bit of oil. Place 1 ball of meat on one half of oiled paper, then fold other half over. Using a rolling pin or wine bottle, gently roll meat into a very thin oval between parchment (it should be about 9x6"). Transfer, with parchment, to a rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with 3 more sheets of paper and remaining meat. Chill until ready to use.
I made as per the recipe, apart from charring the corn on the gas while I made the patties to give the a little smoke. They were very delicious and tasty, and also quick and easy. I didn't bother with the food processor either. My problem was making the patties to big and too thin, which made them hard to transfer. I also had a wax paper collapse, and landed up having to feed some to a very happy cat! Next time I think I might try cling film, which doesn't dissolve from the meat juices.
This is pico de gallo, also called salsa fresca. This is not what most people in the States think of when they think of salsa. The salsa you find at Mexican restaurants and the like is usually a salsa roja, which has very similar ingredients, but is usually pureed and is often made by first roasting the vegetables both to bring out their flavors as well as to get them to the desired texture. Many people make it with canned tomatoes as well, which are also cooked, resulting in the kind of "mouth feel" one expects with this kind of a salsa. In short, the title of this recipe "Mexican Salsa" is very misleading and should really be changed, possibly to "Salsa Fresca" if not just calling it pico de gallo.
Congratulations on your son becoming a marine. Mine is just getting out of the Navy after 8 years. And I agree with Debra above, boot camp will be the longest 13 weeks of your life. Getting mail from home is so important to them at that time, so yes, write often. My son asked me to, so I wrote him everyday and he was delighted. After a hard days work(out) it is something they look forward to. Your son will do fine and the experience will serve him well in his future career. 

Hi Mary Ann 🙂 We love cilantro, so I’ve never made this salsa without it. Most salsas actually have some cilantro in it, but if you hate the taste, you could substitute a bit of fresh parsley, or eliminate the cilantro altogether. I can’t guarantee the taste though, since my recipe uses cilantro as a big ingredient. The scoops method you mentioned sounds yummy!
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