I like to keep a big jar of the homemade salsa in my refrigerator for up to a week. I serve the chips and salsa with quick weeknight dinners like quesadillas or tacos, and Keith loves them as a side with his sandwiches at lunch. The kids even dip veggies in the salsa for afternoon snacks. I’m not exaggerating when I say that this is truly a kitchen staple — whether we’re hosting a party or not!
Living in Carlsbad (Southern California), we go out to Mexican food a LOT.  No matter what I order, I ensure there is a big pile of fresh Pico de Gallo on my plate.  It’s a staple at every Mexican restaurant and at every Mexican table for a reason. It simply doesn’t get much easier or more freshly delicious than Pico de Gallo.  It adds a punch of vibrant flavor to every dish or is just as delicious scooped up by a chip.   So to make every Mexican dish you serve better and in preparation of my Al Pastor Tacos coming later this week (below – eeek!  so excited to share!), I thought it high time I brought you this easyPico de Gallo recipe.
Texas is known for its Tex Mex cuisine, and it just so happens to be one of my favorite things about my native state. If you’ve never made it down to these parts, allow me to paint you a picture: You walk into a restaurant. Nothing too fancy, but the smell immediately seduces every last one of your taste buds. You’ll take a quick glance around, and you can’t help but notice there are baskets of warm, paper-thin tortilla chips on every table, accompanied by salsa.
Tomatoes. Choose deeply colored, firm with-with-a-little-give, ripe tomatoes for maximum flavor because this recipe centers around the tomatoes.  We want ripe for flavor but not too ripe or they will get mushy and fall apart.  Also, make sure they smell like a tomato – if they don’t smell then they will taste like cardboard.  You can use plum tomatoes, but I prefer Roma tomatoes because they have fewer seeds to scoop out.
Seasoned to perfection with our very own sea-salt hand-harvested in the clear blue waters of Colima, Mexico, our authentic Mexican products are made with non-GMO fruits, vegetables and herbs from our farm in Northern California. Discover our fresh salsas, homemade corn tortilla chips and so much more, made by hand, with love, and the magic of seasonal, locally grown, pure ingredients.
The Spanish name for this salsa means "rooster's beak," and originally referred to a salad of jicama, peanuts, oranges, and onions. But today, whether you're in Minneapolis or Mexico City, if you ask for pico de gallo, you'll get the familiar cilantro-flecked combination of chopped tomato, onion, and fresh chiles. This tart, crisp condiment (also known as salsa Mexicana) has become so common on Mexican tables that it seems like no coincidence that its colors match those of the national flag. Besides finding firm ripe tomatoes and seeding them, the key to this salsa is adding plenty of lime juice and salt, and not skimping on the chiles. Because without a burst of acidity and heat, you're just eating chopped tomatoes.

Now, this is how seriously easy this salsa is to make, folks: The avocados? They don’t even have to be chopped. Just quarter them and throw those suckers in your blender (well, skin and seed removed, of course), along with some quartered tomatillos, half of a roughly chopped onion and garlic clove, along with a few cilantro leaves for flavor, and a roughly chopped jalapeno for a little heat.

The recipe I'm sharing today is a simplified version of a roasted salsa that I normally make the "long" way--firing up the grill and roasting the chiles, and oven roasting fresh tomatoes, garlic and onions. When tomatoes and chiles are abundant in the farmer's markets in the summer, I can enough salsa to get us through the fall and winter. If you're interested in making roasted salsa from scratch with all fresh ingredients, here's that recipe. That post and recipe include canning instructions, too.


Serve slightly chilled or at room temperature. If you serve it really cold it tastes flat. The subtle flavor of the ingredients doesn’t shine through. If you are not convinced, do a taste test. Eat a batch that is ice cold and then eat batch that is at room temperature. You will see the difference. I guarantee it. Pico de gallo is best when eaten fresh.
Congratulations on your son becoming a marine. Mine is just getting out of the Navy after 8 years. And I agree with Debra above, boot camp will be the longest 13 weeks of your life. Getting mail from home is so important to them at that time, so yes, write often. My son asked me to, so I wrote him everyday and he was delighted. After a hard days work(out) it is something they look forward to. Your son will do fine and the experience will serve him well in his future career. 
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