La salsa de tres quesos, tiene una textura suave y un sabor fuerte perfecto para acompañar pastas como los ñoquis de patata, raviolis caseros o cualquier pasta fresca. Los quesos que se utilicen pueden variar según su preferencia otra opciones son, queso azul o camembert. Y también podemos refrigerar la salsa para obtener una pasta de queso para untar panecillos deliciosa.
It’s easy to make either a coarse salsa with just a knife and chopping board - alternatively, for a smooth salsa, whizz the ingredients in a food processor. Serve salsa with tortilla chips and dips such as guacamole or soured cream, or use it as a sauce or for topping pasta or pizza. Fruit salsas made with mango or pineapple go well with grilled fish or chicken.

“From Rick Bayless, 'Authentic Mexican.' If you're looking for an authentic Mexican salsa, this is it! It's so simple too! I only use one onion and two jalapenos when I make it, but I decided I'd post the original recipe instead of altering it. The way I make it produces a medium heat. I'd imagine making it his way would produce a hot salsa. I really like it with the lime juice. I haven't made it with the vinegar yet.”


El queso es un ingrediente delicioso y versátil que le dará un toque genial a tus platos de vegetales, pastas y carnes. ¿Te animas a probar una solución simple y gourmet?, entonces no puedes perderte esta receta de salsa de queso que servirá para convertir cualquier preparación simple en un plato 5 estrellas con pocos ingredientes. Atento, porque en unComo.com te explicamos paso a paso cómo hacer una salsa de queso fácil y rápida.
Hi Mary Ann 🙂 We love cilantro, so I’ve never made this salsa without it. Most salsas actually have some cilantro in it, but if you hate the taste, you could substitute a bit of fresh parsley, or eliminate the cilantro altogether. I can’t guarantee the taste though, since my recipe uses cilantro as a big ingredient. The scoops method you mentioned sounds yummy!

Living in Carlsbad (Southern California), we go out to Mexican food a LOT.  No matter what I order, I ensure there is a big pile of fresh Pico de Gallo on my plate.  It’s a staple at every Mexican restaurant and at every Mexican table for a reason. It simply doesn’t get much easier or more freshly delicious than Pico de Gallo.  It adds a punch of vibrant flavor to every dish or is just as delicious scooped up by a chip.   So to make every Mexican dish you serve better and in preparation of my Al Pastor Tacos coming later this week (below – eeek!  so excited to share!), I thought it high time I brought you this easyPico de Gallo recipe.
If you're looking for a fresh and flavorful salsa, this recipe is an excellent choice. The combination of diced tomatoes, peppers, garlic, and lime juice make for a classic fresh salsa. Serve it with tacos, burritos, or as a party dip with tortilla roll-ups or tortilla chips. It is a very good condiment to serve alongside grilled or baked fish fillets, grilled chicken, steaks, and pork chops.
I'm on the hunt for an out-of-this-world pico de gallo recipe. While this was not it, this will be my go-to base recipe for the time being. Fresh and good. Make sure to drain as much liquid from the tomatoes as possible during seeding and chopping. Let the lime juice and seasonings stand out by eliminating tomato liquid completely. Day 2 the flavor was still good in our case.
This is how I make mine, minus the Cumin. I’m going to try it the next time I make a batch. Family and friends are always asking me to make them some. It’s so easy and sooooo good!! Sometimes I can it too. All you have to do is put it on the stove and heat it up slowly, then into your cleaned and prepped mason jars. It keeps for about 3-4 months unopened.
Vamos a cocinarla a fuego medio hasta que se poche y se dore un poco, para lo que iremos removiendo de vez en cuando para que no se nos pegue. Cuando esté blandita la cebolla vamos a echar un poco de pimienta negra recién molida e iremos agregando los cuatro tipos de quesos troceados, para que se vayan fundiendo más fácilmente. Lo hacemos a fuego medio-suave, para que se vayan mezclando poco a poco y no se nos quemen.  

I know when I say tomatillo, some of you are already headed for the hills, but halt those steps for just a moment, and allow me to ease your nightshade veggie fears. Cause that’s all they are, ya know? A little nightshade vegetable that comes equipped with its very own little wrapper. So essentially, we’ve got ourselves a green little tomato in its very own little jacket, that goes by the name husk.
Outside Mexico and Central America, the following salsas are common to each of the following regions; in Argentina and the Southern Cone, chimichurri sauce is common. Chimichurri is "a spicy vinegar-parsley sauce that is the salsa (and leading condiment) in Argentina and Uruguay, served with grilled meat. It is made of chopped fresh parsley and onion, seasoned with garlic, oregano, salt, cayenne chilies and black pepper and bound with oil and vinegar."[3] In Costa Rica, dishes are prepared with salsa Lizano, a thin, smooth, light brown sauce. In Cuba and the Caribbean, a typical salsa is mojo. Unlike the tomato-based salsas, mojo typically consists of olive oil, garlic, and citrus juice, and is used both to marinate meats and as a dipping sauce. In Peru, a traditional salsa is peri peri or piri piri sauce: "The national condiment of Peru, peri-peri sauce is made in medium to hot levels of spiciness—the more chili, or the hotter variety of chile used, the hotter the sauce. Original peri-peri uses the African bird’s eye chili (the Swahili word for the chili is peri-peri). Milder sauces may use only cayenne and serrano chilies. To a base of vinegar and oil, garlic and lemon juice are added, plus other seasonings, which often include paprika or tomato paste for flavor and color, onions and herb—each company has its own recipe. It is also used as a cooking sauce."[4]
I did choose canned diced chilies in this recipe only because I wanted a milder salsa with a hint of smokiness, but if you want a spicier salsa, leave out the diced chiles and roast a couple of jalapeños along with the tomatoes. Or you can even use both. Totally up to you! Want to give it a nice kick? Use a habanero, scotch bonnet, or ghost pepper to really crank up the heat.
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