You can easily make enough to feed a large crowd or have some extra to freeze so that you can have it on hand any time the chips and salsa craving hits or company stops by.  You can also cut the recipe in half for a personal sized little batch of salsa.  You won’t want to more than double the recipe because generally the blender or food processor won’t be big enough.
Living in Carlsbad (Southern California), we go out to Mexican food a LOT.  No matter what I order, I ensure there is a big pile of fresh Pico de Gallo on my plate.  It’s a staple at every Mexican restaurant and at every Mexican table for a reason. It simply doesn’t get much easier or more freshly delicious than Pico de Gallo.  It adds a punch of vibrant flavor to every dish or is just as delicious scooped up by a chip.   So to make every Mexican dish you serve better and in preparation of my Al Pastor Tacos coming later this week (below – eeek!  so excited to share!), I thought it high time I brought you this easyPico de Gallo recipe.
This recipe calls for one heaping cup of corn kernels, which is just about the amount you’ll get from an average-sized ear of corn. When fresh corn is in season, you’ll want to use it in this salsa, but thawed frozen corn can be substituted in other seasons. The texture of frozen kernels is a little softer, but you can expect the same delicious result.
The salsa is made with fresh tomatoes and peppers, and it is seasoned perfectly with cilantro and lime juice. See the tips and variations for some add-in ideas and more. The extra step of pouring boiling water over the chopped onion and garlic may be new and perplexing to some home chefs. Don't skip this step! The boiling water helps to take the bite out of the raw onions and garlic. You'll be left with their delicious flavor, while the process removes any harshness.
This homemade salsa recipe is pretty basic.  There are lots of recipes out there and lots of great recipes.  Why this one is my trusty go to recipe that I have used most of my life, is the combination of being entirely delicious, but yet still so easy to make!  With the use of some fresh ingredients and some canned you are able to trick your mouth into thinking this recipe took 10 hours of hard labor peeling tomatoes to make, when really I was able to whip up a batch of the homemade salsa in as little as 10 minutes!
Deja hervir la salsa a fuego lento por 8 a 10 minutos o hasta que adopte una consistencia homogénea. Cuando la salsa empiece a hervir y a formar burbujas, baja la temperatura al mínimo o hasta el número más bajo de la perilla. Esto la llevará a fuego lento, justo por debajo del punto de ebullición, mientras sigue calentándose. Cuando la salsa tenga una consistencia homogénea, retírala del fuego.[10]
Absolutely wonderful! Just finished making IT! I made it with all fresh ingredients and added some extra little skinny cucumbers! For extra flavor a bit of Heinz Ketchup and Sriracha sauce! My husband just left to pick up some bags of Doritos. We can’t always get the “stuff” we so took for granted in Canada. Thanks so much for this incredible recipe….we both appreciate it!
La primera leche que se usó para quesos fue de cabras u ovejas, ya que eran más comunes en áreas mediterráneas. Pero, posiblemente el hallazgo más antiguo que data de unos 7.500 años sea el que se encontró en la actual Polonia. También se han encontrado antiguos registros sumerios que se remontan al año 4000 a. C. En ellos se constata que se comía queso. En el Antiguo Egipto también el queso era un alimento bien valorado, lo demuestran restos de quesos encontrados en vasijas de arcilla que datan del 2.300 a. C.
Let me know how many times you had to slap your hand from eating it ALL! Leave a comment here, find me on Facebook or tag me on Instagram in your main comment at both @veggiesdontbite #veggiesdontbite so I don’t miss it! I respond to all your comments, I’m never ignoring you! And while I respond, I am most likely snacking on this salsa and chips. It’s addicting. But I can stop if I want. Who am I kidding, no I can’t…
This is pretty much my exact recipe, only I stopped measuring a long time ago and I’ve never tried using canned tomatoes along with the fresh. Fresh salsa is definitely the way to go. I can’t even eat canned salsa anymore. One thing I do sometimes to add depth is to roast the tomato, garlic, and jalapeno (just throw it all on a baking sheet and let it go for about 20 minutes at 400F, turning once if I’m not feeling too lazy). This in combo with the fresh cilantro and lime juice gets rave reviews. I bet using canned tomatoes would add a similar depth!
I’ve tried the recipe both ways simmering and no simmer. I like the no simmer only because it tastes a bit more fresh. I add the garlic and just a bit of lime juice. Was wondering whether or not it requires refrigeration. I’ve heard that storing tomatoes in the fridge is not good for them. My wife wants me to make a batch for her to enter in the salsa cook off at her school. Making over and over while the fresh tomatoes are in season
“From Rick Bayless, 'Authentic Mexican.' If you're looking for an authentic Mexican salsa, this is it! It's so simple too! I only use one onion and two jalapenos when I make it, but I decided I'd post the original recipe instead of altering it. The way I make it produces a medium heat. I'd imagine making it his way would produce a hot salsa. I really like it with the lime juice. I haven't made it with the vinegar yet.”
* ~ Can be prepared several hours in advance. Combine lime juice, honey, cumin, garlic and sea salt in a small glass jar. Cover, shake well and refrigerate. Cut up other ingredients except the avocado and keep in separate containers in the refrigerator. Combine just before serving, draining oranges and tomatoes well before adding. Peel and dice avocado. Add avocado to orange mixture and gently stir to combine.

Here at Delish, we are firm believers that everything tastes better after it's been roasted (hello, brussels sprouts!), and that's why we opted to roast a few of our salsa ingredients. It brings out the flavors of the jalapeños and deeply sweeten the cherry tomatoes. It takes away some of the pungency of the onion and gives it a more caramelized flavor. This is what will make your salsa stand out above all the rest. 
I really believe that salsa is best when only a few key ingredients are involved. While there are so many recipes for this dip, literally millions and some with dozens of ingredients, I still believe in my mantra: simple is always best. This recipe is the perfect accompaniment for quesadillas, fajitas, taquitos, or served beside some homemade guac. You name it!
I did choose canned diced chilies in this recipe only because I wanted a milder salsa with a hint of smokiness, but if you want a spicier salsa, leave out the diced chiles and roast a couple of jalapeños along with the tomatoes. Or you can even use both. Totally up to you! Want to give it a nice kick? Use a habanero, scotch bonnet, or ghost pepper to really crank up the heat.
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