Pico de Gallo and I go way back! Hahaha… Yes, I can laugh about it now, but when I was 14 and 15 years old, one of my jobs on the weekends was to make huge batches of pico de gallo at my parents’ taqueria. I remember my Dad dragging me out of a sound sleep at 5 in the morning on Saturdays and Sundays to help him open up the taqueria. While my Dad was busy tending to the menudo and barbacoa, I was chopping away and trying to wake up at the same time… Now when I look back, I long for those days, that special time I spent with my Dad. And for me, I can’t have fresh salsa on my table without a fresh bowl of guacamole! Let the weekend begin and don’t forget the chips! #mexicanfood #foodieforlife 


Had some tomatoes from the Albuquerque grower’s market at their peak (and perhaps a tad beyond). Made the recipe as written except for an extra 3rd serrano (seeds, ribs, and all), 3 large and very fresh garlic cloves, and one chipotle en adobo. It’s cooling in the pan on the stove as I write, but I can already tell this is my new “signature” salsa. Hot diggity!

So pregnant me hears a Mexican song on the radio and immediately envision myself eating dinner at Mexico Restaurant. I decide it’s the chips and salsa I really want and since I’m headed to the grocery store anyway, I decide to try my hand at restaurant style salsa. Found your recipe while in the store, and made it asap when I got home. uncouldnt believe how easy it was! My mind was a bit blown that canned tomatoes are the base ingredient. My only critique would be to leave off the cumin or at least try it in a small bowl to make sure you like it before adding to the whole mixture.


Made this today with my remaining garden tomatoes, roasting the tomatoes, garlic, and onions as directed. Within just a few seconds of pulsing in the food processor, the mixture turned to complete soup. I mean, there was just no salvaging a salsa type of consistency out of it. The spices are nice and I’m going to use it to make a cream of tomato soup tomorrow, but wanted to warn others who may be really needing a salsa end product. And maybe you have some tips for ensuring this doesn’t happen?
So when it comes to salsa, I think we are all in agreement that the one with avocados is pretty much always the winner, but a pair or trio of dips never hurt anybody. If you’re hosting a fajita night, check out these other easy Mexican dip recipes perfect for entertaining: crockpot taco queso, fresh salsa, and authentic guacamole would all look lovely next to a bowl of your creamy tomatillo avocado salsa! Please, enjoy!
While this recipe can be made any time of the year, I decided to dress up my roll-ups for the holidays! With clever stacking and a few “ornaments,” I made a roll-up Christmas tree! It’s fun to do, and the festive presentation will make this appetizer even more appealing to your holiday guests. Let me show you how quickly the roll-ups come together, plus my ideas for serving them.
This looks INCREDIBLE!! I also judge Mexican restaurants on the quality of their salsa. I became ADDICTED to chips and salsa when my son was first eating solids. Since there is little time to eat when caring for an infant, I would be feeing him with one hand and snacking on chips and salsa with the other. It is now my go-to when I’m having a snack craving!

I came across this easy and tasty snack while searching online for healthy munchies for kids. Great for after school, it’s really quick to make and filling enough to hold the kids until dinner. To satisfy heftier appetites or to serve as a power lunch, cut each tortilla into fewer pieces or provide one per child. The recipe is easy to increase as needed. —Mary Haluch, Ludlow, Massachusetts

Just made this to top with your crock pot chicken tacos, I’m in HEAVEN. This salsa is so quick to put together and the flavor is incredible. I use one can of Original Rotel and one of the mild. I always keep sliced jalapeños in a jar in my fridge so I threw in a couple of those for some heat and you’re right, tastes WAY better than a restaurant. I’m going to make another batch for this weekend!
By default, this isn’t a very spicy salsa.  I would probably rate it is mild, or possibly medium if you are extra sensitive.  All 3 of my kids have eaten it from the time that they were allowed to start eating chips.  There is a little bit of heat from the ROTEL tomatoes, but it is mellowed by the lime.  You can increase the spiciness of the salsa by adding extra raw jalapeño to it in the first blending step, or by using “Hot” ROTEL tomatoes rather than original.
While some people may choose to make their homemade salsa with fresh tomatoes only (I used to be one of them) I’ve actually come around to believe that canned tomatoes are your better option for restaurant-style salsa. Because canned tomatoes are picked at the height of tomato season and canned with a high-heat technique to preserve the flavor, canned tomatoes will often taste fresher than the out-of-season tomatoes that you can buy year ’round at the grocery store. That means 11 months out of the year (in most regions) canned tomatoes will actually taste fresher.
Looks gorgeous girl!! This looks like the perfect food group to me! I think I could live off salsa and chips! I love that you added roasted garlic, yum! I have never had a salsa in my life that didn’t have a kick of heat to it….everything down here is spicy and the one I love from Trader Joes I buy sometimes is also spicy, so I’m intrigued at how this tastes with no heat added! Now, I’m craving salsa.
And when you’re hosting a party, have you ever noticed that the chips and salsa are the first foods to disappear? No matter how many fancy side salads, dips, or canapés folks set out, the chips and salsa are inevitably the most popular. You just can’t go wrong with the simple combo, and today I’ve upped the game. With a fresh and easy homemade salsa, you’ll never go back to the jarred store-bought version again!

Hi, Sommer, I was pointed to your blog by Cory Kowalski. I immediately saved your detox soup recipe AND the salsa one. I love salsa and love making it, but I can’t eat as much as I’d like to because I have kidney disease (and tomatoes aren’t good for me). I am going to try making a salsa with an extra dose of tomatilos, substituting them for some of the tomatoes. I’ll let you know how it comes out. BTW, I can’t find a ‘follow’ button on your site — except pointing to Pinterest, which I know nothing about.
Devein jalapenos. The ribs and seeds carry the most heat in peppers, so we are going to remove them but you can always add in some seeds later.  To seed and devein your jalapeno(s), cut the stem off then cut the jalapeño in half lengthwise.  Scoop out the seeds with a spoon or pairing knife.  If there is still white rib remaining in some places, then slice it out.

At the Jerez Sunda market, author Diana Kennedy spotted a man filling his large bag with handfuls of shiny, multicolored chiles of all shapes and sizes. She asked how he was going to use them. "I am going to make a salsa mexicana of course." It's going to be delicious, she thought, with all those crisp flavors and degrees of piquancy.You can very the salsa with what is available in your market. Do not remove the seeds of small chiles like serranos. Serve the salsa as a condiment. Delicious, Quick Side Dishes
Congrats and Semper Fi!!! From a Marine Daughter, Mother, and Mother-in-law… You Really do have reason to be proud as I can tell you are. I had my Son’s Boot Camp Graduation party instead of a High School Graduation party (my son graduated early to go in on Memorial Day 7 years ago. If you would like to touch base on anything. Marine Mom to Marine Mom feel free. Tell your son Ooh Rah!! from my family and myself. Oh and I love Mexican food too. The Pico was wonderful and will be making again. Congrats again and welcome the the Marine Family!!

The salsa is made with fresh tomatoes and peppers, and it is seasoned perfectly with cilantro and lime juice. See the tips and variations for some add-in ideas and more. The extra step of pouring boiling water over the chopped onion and garlic may be new and perplexing to some home chefs. Don't skip this step! The boiling water helps to take the bite out of the raw onions and garlic. You'll be left with their delicious flavor, while the process removes any harshness.
Where does nutrition info come from? Nutrition facts are provided as a courtesy, sourced from the USDA Food Database. You can find individual ingredient carb counts we use in the Low Carb & Keto Food List. Carb count excludes sugar alcohols. Net carb count excludes both fiber and sugar alcohols, because these do not affect blood sugar in most people. We try to be accurate, but feel free to make your own calculations.

The salsa is made with fresh tomatoes and peppers, and it is seasoned perfectly with cilantro and lime juice. See the tips and variations for some add-in ideas and more. The extra step of pouring boiling water over the chopped onion and garlic may be new and perplexing to some home chefs. Don't skip this step! The boiling water helps to take the bite out of the raw onions and garlic. You'll be left with their delicious flavor, while the process removes any harshness.


This is a fantastic and super simple recipe! I doubled the recipe because I consider salsa to be a food group in and of itself and wanted to have some for a few days. I also doubled the jalapeño as I like more kick. I must disagree with one of the other reviewers in that I found the flavor to be better the second day and still better the day after that! So much so that the next time I make it, I will make it the day before I need it so the flavors can meld overnight.


I want to share with you my favorite salsa recipe. It has great tomato flavor with the pop of cilantro and just right amount of heat from the serrano chiles. It goes well with chips, carne asada tacos, taquitos, eggs and just about any other dish that you like to add salsa to. You will find a variation of this salsa on tables throughout Mexico. It’s a classic and with good reason.
Just finished preparing this and it turned out awesome! I basically took the original recipe and eyeball quadrupled it. Honestly the easiest recipe ever. My food processor wasn’t big enough so I did it in batches and stirred it all up in a mixing bowl. The apple cider vinegar cuts the acidity and the lime brings out all of the fresh flavors. The salt makes it all come together. Thanks.
I really believe that salsa is best when only a few key ingredients are involved. While there are so many recipes for this dip, literally millions and some with dozens of ingredients, I still believe in my mantra: simple is always best. This recipe is the perfect accompaniment for quesadillas, fajitas, taquitos, or served beside some homemade guac. You name it!
Salsa and Queso Recipes are some of our favorite appetizers on the planet! Nothing beats a night of staying in and enjoying EASY Mexican food at home. These Salsa Recipes and Queso Recipes hit all the high notes with none of the fuss. The BEST Salsas and Cheese Dips you’ll ever come across and the only recipes you’ll ever need for game day or Cinco de Mayo!
We lived in West Texas for 18 years and now live in NE Pennsylvania. Didn’t have to worry about Salsa in Texas as there was a Mexican restaurant on almost every corner. Not so in PA. I have been making my Salsa (Mexican Chili) from a good Mexican friend of ours now for 12 years with some adjustments, 1 large can of Furmano’s whole tomatoes, jalapenos, cumin, coriander, salt fresh cilantro (when we can get it), minced garlic, diced yellow onions, lemon and lime juice, and some other spices. Will have to say it is VERY good.Have had many people Rave about it who are transplants like myself from Texas and California.

Cinco de Mayo is this Thursday. You haven’t even prepared for the party you’re attending. You’re supposed to make that thing you said you would. What was it, oh yeah, salsa. Rachel was counting on you. You promised. You scour the internet for a recipe. This one on D.R. Horton’s blog pops up. You think, “How could I mess this up?” It gets made. It’s delicious. You arrive at the party, salsa in hand. You realize you brought the party. Everyone loves it. You’re humbled. You reward yourself with a margarita. Okay, maybe two margaritas.
karinagw, thank you for the glowing report! We also enjoy salsa with a little more texture. Next time you can add more peppers for extra spice. We have several friends who don't enjoy the flavor of cilantro, either. One says it tastes like dirt! So we have experimented with cilantro-less salsa and found a little lime rounds on the flavors. Thanks again for your feedback. Have a great week.

Tomatoes are the most important ingredient. The fresher they are the better your salsa will taste. Look for the ripest ones you can find. Getting a good char on the vegetables is another key to developing the flavor. The lime juice brightens and enhances the flavor. The recipe calls for two serrano peppers but only add one if you want to reduce the heat.


Let sit. After you combine the Pico de Gallo ingredients in a bowl, let them sit at room temperate in order for the flavors to meld together.  If you taste it right away, I guarantee you will be disappointed. The salt draws out the flavor from the tomatoes, which we desperately want in this recipe.  Sitting also tones down the raw onion as it mingles with the lime.  Give your Pico de Gallo at least 30 minutes for the magic to happen.
Let sit. After you combine the Pico de Gallo ingredients in a bowl, let them sit at room temperate in order for the flavors to meld together.  If you taste it right away, I guarantee you will be disappointed. The salt draws out the flavor from the tomatoes, which we desperately want in this recipe.  Sitting also tones down the raw onion as it mingles with the lime.  Give your Pico de Gallo at least 30 minutes for the magic to happen.
As for the amount of each of these ingredients, it’s totally up to you.  I have measured out my favorite ratios in the recipe included below.  But pico de gallo is totally one of those recipes where it’s best to give it a taste and add more (or less) of what you love.  For example, I love mine nice and spicy, so I usually add two (or three) chile peppers.  Barclay isn’t as big of an onion fan as I am, so he prefers his with less onion (and more finely-chopped) than me.  And as always, feel free to add more or less salt to taste.  You get the idea.
Canned tomatoes are typically picked at their peak ripeness, which means they will be more flavorful and sweet. They are then processed within hours of being harvested to maintain the best flavor. There are different types of canned tomato products, however, diced or whole for salsas will achieve the proper consistency. Fresh tomatoes can be used in combination to add texture, however, they are much more watery since they have not be cooked to release some of the moisture. They are however excellent for chunkier dips like pico de gallo.
The Spanish name for this salsa means "rooster's beak," and originally referred to a salad of jicama, peanuts, oranges, and onions. But today, whether you're in Minneapolis or Mexico City, if you ask for pico de gallo, you'll get the familiar cilantro-flecked combination of chopped tomato, onion, and fresh chiles. This tart, crisp condiment (also known as salsa Mexicana) has become so common on Mexican tables that it seems like no coincidence that its colors match those of the national flag. Besides finding firm ripe tomatoes and seeding them, the key to this salsa is adding plenty of lime juice and salt, and not skimping on the chiles. Because without a burst of acidity and heat, you're just eating chopped tomatoes.
Salsa mexicana, also known as salsa fresca, is the reigning condiment of Mexico. It is found on the tables of both fancy restaurants and neighborhood taquerías. For some reason, in many parts of the country, it is also known as pico de gallo, or "roosters beak," a designation also given to a regional specialty of Jalisco composed of pieces of jicama, with cucumber, melon, or pineapple, all sprinkled with ground dried chiles. The commonality seems to be either the sharply cut pieces of ingredients or the sharp tastes.
Copyright © 2019 HubPages Inc. and respective owners. Other product and company names shown may be trademarks of their respective owners. HubPages® is a registered Service Mark of HubPages, Inc. HubPages and Hubbers (authors) may earn revenue on this page based on affiliate relationships and advertisements with partners including Amazon, Google, and others.
Salsa is any one of several sauces typical of Mexican cuisine, also known as salsa fresca, hot salsa or salsa picante, particularly those used as dips. Salsa is often tomato-based, and includes ingredients such as onions, chilies, an acid and herbs. It is typically piquant, ranging from mild to extremely hot. Though many different sauce preparations are called salsa in Spanish, in English, it generally refers to raw or near-raw sauces used as dips.
I like to keep a big jar of the homemade salsa in my refrigerator for up to a week. I serve the chips and salsa with quick weeknight dinners like quesadillas or tacos, and Keith loves them as a side with his sandwiches at lunch. The kids even dip veggies in the salsa for afternoon snacks. I’m not exaggerating when I say that this is truly a kitchen staple — whether we’re hosting a party or not!
To make it, you’ll begin by dicing your plum tomatoes, jalapeños, and onion. Then, you’ll mince your garlic and chop or tear your cilantro leaves. Add all of these ingredients to a bowl and then add in the zest of a lime (my secret ingredient!) along with the juice of a fresh lime. Sprinkle with your salt and pepper and then gently stir to combine.
Bottom line, pico de gallo is a salsa from Mexico, also known as salsa fresca (fresh salsa), salsa cruda (raw salsa), and salsa huevona (lazy salsa).  It’s traditionally made from chopped fresh tomatoes, onion, chiles (jalapeños or serranos), cilantro, salt and lime juice.  It’s always served chopped, not blended or pureed or mashed.  And it’s used in about a million ways, from sprinkling on tacos and tamales and tostadas, to scooping up with your favorite tortilla chips.
Douglas, I was just wondering about using the iron skillet or comal and the tomatoes. I tried a different recipe the other day and used my iron skillet to toast the ancho chilies, tomatoes and serrano peppers it called for. After blending all the ingredients, I used the same skillet to heat and cook the finished sauce. I only thought about it after the fact and wondered if the acidic sauce changed in flavor by using the iron skillet. I am sure our grandmothers used their iron for everything and never worried about the acid in them, so I am sure this question is moot, but I still want to know. I am not a very good cook, even though I try, and last weeks sauce did not turn out very tasty. I am going to give this one a try and hope it comes out better. Thank you for posting this. 
×