By default, this isn’t a very spicy salsa.  I would probably rate it is mild, or possibly medium if you are extra sensitive.  All 3 of my kids have eaten it from the time that they were allowed to start eating chips.  There is a little bit of heat from the ROTEL tomatoes, but it is mellowed by the lime.  You can increase the spiciness of the salsa by adding extra raw jalapeño to it in the first blending step, or by using “Hot” ROTEL tomatoes rather than original.

Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More…
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Fresh tomatoes: Roma or plum tomatoes are my favorites in pico de gallo, since they contain far fewer seeds than most other tomatoes.  But really, any large tomatoes (just scoop out the excess pulp) or small tomatoes (cherry and grape tomatoes work great) will do.  The freshness of your tomatoes is paramount in this recipe, so try to avoid some of those bland or watery tomatoes that fill stores during the wintertime.  And definitely avoid using canned tomatoes.
This recipe calls for one heaping cup of corn kernels, which is just about the amount you’ll get from an average-sized ear of corn. When fresh corn is in season, you’ll want to use it in this salsa, but thawed frozen corn can be substituted in other seasons. The texture of frozen kernels is a little softer, but you can expect the same delicious result.

Hi Mary Ann 🙂 We love cilantro, so I’ve never made this salsa without it. Most salsas actually have some cilantro in it, but if you hate the taste, you could substitute a bit of fresh parsley, or eliminate the cilantro altogether. I can’t guarantee the taste though, since my recipe uses cilantro as a big ingredient. The scoops method you mentioned sounds yummy!
Fresh tomatoes: Roma or plum tomatoes are my favorites in pico de gallo, since they contain far fewer seeds than most other tomatoes.  But really, any large tomatoes (just scoop out the excess pulp) or small tomatoes (cherry and grape tomatoes work great) will do.  The freshness of your tomatoes is paramount in this recipe, so try to avoid some of those bland or watery tomatoes that fill stores during the wintertime.  And definitely avoid using canned tomatoes.
Chips and salsa is possibly THE perfect snack. While you've probably already got your favorite jar, these homemade recipes will spice up a party, game day, or night on the couch. There's something for everyone, whether you like your salsa plain and simple or mixed with guacamole, fruit, jalapeños, and spices. Looking for more party starters? Try our amazing dip recipes.
I grew up in New Mexico and Arizona, so I have a life-long connection to Mexican food. It's my favorite food. I like it spicy. It's the first kind of food I ever learned to cook. When we were very young (still in elementary school), my sister Nelda and I could prepare an entire Mexican meal of enchiladas and taquitos. It was kind of our sister specialty. Nelda made taquitos the last time we were together--a delicious comfort food from the past.
Made this recipe with my son (10yr old) on a rainy cold Saturday. What a success! Showing him some knife skills, taught him to use a can opener. Told stories. Substituted some of the tomato for a handful of tomatillos so I could teach him to blanch. Finally an hour or so away from technology to just talk with my son. Salsa turned out absolutely incredible btw. Thanks
Where does nutrition info come from? Nutrition facts are provided as a courtesy, sourced from the USDA Food Database. You can find individual ingredient carb counts we use in the Low Carb & Keto Food List. Carb count excludes sugar alcohols. Net carb count excludes both fiber and sugar alcohols, because these do not affect blood sugar in most people. We try to be accurate, but feel free to make your own calculations.
Update: Because I was paranoid about the peppers, I actually could have upped them a smidge. OTOH, right now it has a gentle heat which won't burn you out after a couple bites. I did lie though. I omitted the celantro because I am one of those whose tastebuds interpret it as soap. Something tastes like it needs a little more of something, but possibly I mis-measured because the taste is wonderful..I might not whirl the tomatoes quite as much next time though. Boy, this a long comment to basically say Brava.

Mexican food has the reputation for being heavy and greasy, unjustly deserved in my opinion. This dish is the complete opposite. All vegetables, low calories, and no fat. Totally guilt-free. Eat with reckless abandon. It is vegetarian and vegan to boot. Kids will eat it too because it is “salsa”, not yucky vegetables and it works just as well with fussy adults who don’t like vegetables.
It’s all in the tomatoes… or more accurately, in how you prepare them! When making homemade Pico De Gallo, I prefer to core and remove the seeds from the tomatoes to keep the salsa from getting soupy. The salt will continue to draw out the natural juices from the tomatoes, so you’ll always end up with a juicier Pico De Gallo than when you started. If you were to keep the juiciest parts of the tomatoes, add lime juice and add the salt which will draw out even more juices, you’ll end up with a much more watery salsa than intended. It’ll still be delicious and enjoyable, just not quite the right consistency.
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