It’s easy to make either a coarse salsa with just a knife and chopping board - alternatively, for a smooth salsa, whizz the ingredients in a food processor. Serve salsa with tortilla chips and dips such as guacamole or soured cream, or use it as a sauce or for topping pasta or pizza. Fruit salsas made with mango or pineapple go well with grilled fish or chicken.
This is pico de gallo, also called salsa fresca. This is not what most people in the States think of when they think of salsa. The salsa you find at Mexican restaurants and the like is usually a salsa roja, which has very similar ingredients, but is usually pureed and is often made by first roasting the vegetables both to bring out their flavors as well as to get them to the desired texture. Many people make it with canned tomatoes as well, which are also cooked, resulting in the kind of "mouth feel" one expects with this kind of a salsa. In short, the title of this recipe "Mexican Salsa" is very misleading and should really be changed, possibly to "Salsa Fresca" if not just calling it pico de gallo.
Hi Mary Ann 🙂 We love cilantro, so I’ve never made this salsa without it. Most salsas actually have some cilantro in it, but if you hate the taste, you could substitute a bit of fresh parsley, or eliminate the cilantro altogether. I can’t guarantee the taste though, since my recipe uses cilantro as a big ingredient. The scoops method you mentioned sounds yummy!
It’s easy to make either a coarse salsa with just a knife and chopping board - alternatively, for a smooth salsa, whizz the ingredients in a food processor. Serve salsa with tortilla chips and dips such as guacamole or soured cream, or use it as a sauce or for topping pasta or pizza. Fruit salsas made with mango or pineapple go well with grilled fish or chicken.
I’m a “transplant” from Wisconsin currently living in Texas. Even after 20 years, I can’t get enough of our wonderful local citrus. This is one way to work it into a main dish. The combination of tangy fruit, spicy jalapeno and distinctive cilantro is perfect over any meat, poultry or fish. We also dip into it with chips. —Lois Kildahl, McAllen, Texas

This recipe is a great starting point to develop your own Mexican salsa recipe. Adjust any or all of the ingredients to suit your tastes. Although this recipe calls for charring the chiles, you can also make it without charring them. Add more chiles for a spicier sauce or reduce the number for a milder version. Substituting jalapeño chiles for the serrano chiles will make a milder salsa too.

And when you’re hosting a party, have you ever noticed that the chips and salsa are the first foods to disappear? No matter how many fancy side salads, dips, or canapés folks set out, the chips and salsa are inevitably the most popular. You just can’t go wrong with the simple combo, and today I’ve upped the game. With a fresh and easy homemade salsa, you’ll never go back to the jarred store-bought version again!

By default, this isn’t a very spicy salsa.  I would probably rate it is mild, or possibly medium if you are extra sensitive.  All 3 of my kids have eaten it from the time that they were allowed to start eating chips.  There is a little bit of heat from the ROTEL tomatoes, but it is mellowed by the lime.  You can increase the spiciness of the salsa by adding extra raw jalapeño to it in the first blending step, or by using “Hot” ROTEL tomatoes rather than original.


Just made this to top with your crock pot chicken tacos, I’m in HEAVEN. This salsa is so quick to put together and the flavor is incredible. I use one can of Original Rotel and one of the mild. I always keep sliced jalapeños in a jar in my fridge so I threw in a couple of those for some heat and you’re right, tastes WAY better than a restaurant. I’m going to make another batch for this weekend!

Great dish!  I got rave reviews from my family when cooking this for a special holiday dinner. Simple!  I had 5 lbs instead of 4 lbs of robs so they needed about 10 minutes more cooking time. I used a meat thermometer and let the temp rise to 130 degrees F before removing to get to med rare. Be sure to not hit a bone when taking the temp!  One other thing, tent the meat with aluminum foil while resting the meat after the oven.  Serve on a hot plate (I just microwave mine).  :) 

This is pretty much my exact recipe, only I stopped measuring a long time ago and I’ve never tried using canned tomatoes along with the fresh. Fresh salsa is definitely the way to go. I can’t even eat canned salsa anymore. One thing I do sometimes to add depth is to roast the tomato, garlic, and jalapeno (just throw it all on a baking sheet and let it go for about 20 minutes at 400F, turning once if I’m not feeling too lazy). This in combo with the fresh cilantro and lime juice gets rave reviews. I bet using canned tomatoes would add a similar depth!

This is a great salsa for beginners in Mexican cuisine. There are other salsas that are a little bit more complicated, and which require that you char the tomatoes and other veggies first. This salsa roja recipe, however, just requires that you blend the raw vegetables together, and then cook them with a bit of olive oil before adding onions and cilantro. 
It’s all in the tomatoes… or more accurately, in how you prepare them! When making homemade Pico De Gallo, I prefer to core and remove the seeds from the tomatoes to keep the salsa from getting soupy. The salt will continue to draw out the natural juices from the tomatoes, so you’ll always end up with a juicier Pico De Gallo than when you started. If you were to keep the juiciest parts of the tomatoes, add lime juice and add the salt which will draw out even more juices, you’ll end up with a much more watery salsa than intended. It’ll still be delicious and enjoyable, just not quite the right consistency.
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