Douglas, I was just wondering about using the iron skillet or comal and the tomatoes. I tried a different recipe the other day and used my iron skillet to toast the ancho chilies, tomatoes and serrano peppers it called for. After blending all the ingredients, I used the same skillet to heat and cook the finished sauce. I only thought about it after the fact and wondered if the acidic sauce changed in flavor by using the iron skillet. I am sure our grandmothers used their iron for everything and never worried about the acid in them, so I am sure this question is moot, but I still want to know. I am not a very good cook, even though I try, and last weeks sauce did not turn out very tasty. I am going to give this one a try and hope it comes out better. Thank you for posting this.

Salsa IS its own food group. Or at least it should be and while we’re at that we could decide it counts as one of your five a day, too ;). I eat salsa every day yet sadly can’t find my favourite organic brand [and there actually is only one brand and kind of organic salsa available in anyway] anymore living in the countryside now. The only ones available contain sugar and even though it’s not a ton I don’t like the fact. At least my dippers are vegetables.
Hi Mary Ann 🙂 We love cilantro, so I’ve never made this salsa without it. Most salsas actually have some cilantro in it, but if you hate the taste, you could substitute a bit of fresh parsley, or eliminate the cilantro altogether. I can’t guarantee the taste though, since my recipe uses cilantro as a big ingredient. The scoops method you mentioned sounds yummy!
This is pico de gallo, also called salsa fresca. This is not what most people in the States think of when they think of salsa. The salsa you find at Mexican restaurants and the like is usually a salsa roja, which has very similar ingredients, but is usually pureed and is often made by first roasting the vegetables both to bring out their flavors as well as to get them to the desired texture. Many people make it with canned tomatoes as well, which are also cooked, resulting in the kind of "mouth feel" one expects with this kind of a salsa. In short, the title of this recipe "Mexican Salsa" is very misleading and should really be changed, possibly to "Salsa Fresca" if not just calling it pico de gallo.
I grew up in New Mexico and Arizona, so I have a life-long connection to Mexican food. It's my favorite food. I like it spicy. It's the first kind of food I ever learned to cook. When we were very young (still in elementary school), my sister Nelda and I could prepare an entire Mexican meal of enchiladas and taquitos. It was kind of our sister specialty. Nelda made taquitos the last time we were together--a delicious comfort food from the past.
Sirve la salsa de queso y refrigera el sobrante. Vierte la salsa de queso sobre el plato de pasta que desees o utilízala para preparar un sándwich de carne y queso al estilo de Filadelfia. Para acompañamientos, utilízala como una salsa para mojar con papas fritas, viértela sobre nachos o sobre un bol de verduras mixtas de brócoli y coliflor. Si te quedan sobras, colócalas en un recipiente hermético y guárdalo en el refrigerador por 3 o 4 días.[12]
Canned tomatoes are typically picked at their peak ripeness, which means they will be more flavorful and sweet. They are then processed within hours of being harvested to maintain the best flavor. There are different types of canned tomato products, however, diced or whole for salsas will achieve the proper consistency. Fresh tomatoes can be used in combination to add texture, however, they are much more watery since they have not be cooked to release some of the moisture. They are however excellent for chunkier dips like pico de gallo.
TASTE AND ADJUST THE SALT & HEAT: Give it a taste test and add some more salt if it needs it. If it doesn't have enough heat, add some red pepper flakes. Start with 1/2 teaspoon and go from there. If I'm making salsa for a party, I usually divide the salsa in half and add some heat to some of it. That way I can serve a mild and hot version of the salsa. 

I made this recipe just as described, I drizzled olive oil on the veggies before roasting, and seeded the Tomatoes before roasting. I added two jalapeños fresh picked and one fresh picked green chili. I pulled the skins off the tomatoes when they cooled slightly… The flavor is amazing, perhaps a bit too much heat, I will chill overnight and perhaps only add one jalapeño next time.

¿Cómo la elaboramos? Se hace igual que si hiciésemos una bechamel, añadimos un trozo de mantequilla a la sartén (o una cucharada de aceite), cuando haya fundido y esté caliente añadimos una o dos cucharadas de harina, removemos bien y cuando haya tostado un poco le adicionamos una taza de leche y removemos para que vaya espesando. A continuación le echamos el queso y un poco de sal (podemos añadirle también alguna especie) y una vez este haya fundido lo sacamos del fuego y listo para dipear. ¿Verdad que os viene a la cabeza unos deliciosos nachos con guacamole y esta maravillosa salsa…?


The salsa is made with fresh tomatoes and peppers, and it is seasoned perfectly with cilantro and lime juice. See the tips and variations for some add-in ideas and more. The extra step of pouring boiling water over the chopped onion and garlic may be new and perplexing to some home chefs. Don't skip this step! The boiling water helps to take the bite out of the raw onions and garlic. You'll be left with their delicious flavor, while the process removes any harshness.
Just made this to top with your crock pot chicken tacos, I’m in HEAVEN. This salsa is so quick to put together and the flavor is incredible. I use one can of Original Rotel and one of the mild. I always keep sliced jalapeños in a jar in my fridge so I threw in a couple of those for some heat and you’re right, tastes WAY better than a restaurant. I’m going to make another batch for this weekend!
@Carl. My wife is Mexican and I’ve traveled there many times; particularly the state of Michoacán where she’s from. In Mexico, the sauce that you make is called a “Salsa Cruda” (Raw Sauce). It is perfectly fine to make it without frying/simmering since it’s just one of the MANY ways to make a sauce in the Mexican kitchen. I must say that adding cumin to a sauce is more typical of Tex Mex than the authentic Mexican style sauce. Also, lime is only added to something such as pico de gallo. Salsa verde is another sauce that made by cooking tomatillos, jalapeños and a couple garlic cloves in slightly boiling water for about 10 min. Once the tomatillos are cooked, you add them with a little bit of the cooking water, the chilies, garlic, a piece of white onion, cilantro and salt to a food processor. This is carefully processed due to the hot liquid. Tomatillos can be pretty acidic so a pinch of sugar can be added to counter that. I’ve been in a ranch in Michoacán where they cooked a goat over a wood fire. I saw them make the “birria” (typical Mexican sauce for roasted meats) over the same wood fire. It picked up the smoke taste and I’ll tell you, it was the best BBQ goat that I EVER had!
The addition of fresh onions give this pico de gallo recipe the perfect zing, and the lime helps add freshness while jalapenos add the perfect bit of heat. If you aren’t a big fan of spice be sure to remove all of the membranes and seeds from your jalapenos! This recipe tastes best after it sits for about 20-30 minutes, so the flavors can really blend!
La salsa de tres quesos, tiene una textura suave y un sabor fuerte perfecto para acompañar pastas como los ñoquis de patata, raviolis caseros o cualquier pasta fresca. Los quesos que se utilicen pueden variar según su preferencia otra opciones son, queso azul o camembert. Y también podemos refrigerar la salsa para obtener una pasta de queso para untar panecillos deliciosa.
Tomatoes are the most important ingredient. The fresher they are the better your salsa will taste. Look for the ripest ones you can find. Getting a good char on the vegetables is another key to developing the flavor. The lime juice brightens and enhances the flavor. The recipe calls for two serrano peppers but only add one if you want to reduce the heat.
Incorpora la harina a la mantequilla derretida y cocina la mezcla por 1 o 2 minutos. Sostén el batidor entre el pulgar y el dedo índice y muévelo alrededor de la cacerola con un movimiento circular. Deja que el mango del batidor se mueva ligeramente en tu mano. Sigue batiendo aún después de haber incorporado la harina para eliminar el sabor harinoso. Mantén el fuego bajo y cocina la mezcla por 1 o 2 minutos después de la incorporación de la harina.[7]
Serve slightly chilled or at room temperature. If you serve it really cold it tastes flat. The subtle flavor of the ingredients doesn’t shine through. If you are not convinced, do a taste test. Eat a batch that is ice cold and then eat batch that is at room temperature. You will see the difference. I guarantee it. Pico de gallo is best when eaten fresh.
Douglas, I was just wondering about using the iron skillet or comal and the tomatoes. I tried a different recipe the other day and used my iron skillet to toast the ancho chilies, tomatoes and serrano peppers it called for. After blending all the ingredients, I used the same skillet to heat and cook the finished sauce. I only thought about it after the fact and wondered if the acidic sauce changed in flavor by using the iron skillet. I am sure our grandmothers used their iron for everything and never worried about the acid in them, so I am sure this question is moot, but I still want to know. I am not a very good cook, even though I try, and last weeks sauce did not turn out very tasty. I am going to give this one a try and hope it comes out better. Thank you for posting this. 
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