This recipe calls for one heaping cup of corn kernels, which is just about the amount you’ll get from an average-sized ear of corn. When fresh corn is in season, you’ll want to use it in this salsa, but thawed frozen corn can be substituted in other seasons. The texture of frozen kernels is a little softer, but you can expect the same delicious result.
Had some tomatoes from the Albuquerque grower’s market at their peak (and perhaps a tad beyond). Made the recipe as written except for an extra 3rd serrano (seeds, ribs, and all), 3 large and very fresh garlic cloves, and one chipotle en adobo. It’s cooling in the pan on the stove as I write, but I can already tell this is my new “signature” salsa. Hot diggity!

LOL! I know, no spice here. And you must think I’ve lost it because you know how much I love spice. BUT, I was trying to make this a very family/kid friendly salsa because my whole family loves chips and salsa so much but I’m the only spice fiend. The 4 year old likes some spice, but the others are all spice wussies! It still has loads of flavor, especially with the roasted garlic in there. I love it, although truth be told I often dump my favorite hot sauce over the top. HAHAHA!
¿Cómo la elaboramos? Se hace igual que si hiciésemos una bechamel, añadimos un trozo de mantequilla a la sartén (o una cucharada de aceite), cuando haya fundido y esté caliente añadimos una o dos cucharadas de harina, removemos bien y cuando haya tostado un poco le adicionamos una taza de leche y removemos para que vaya espesando. A continuación le echamos el queso y un poco de sal (podemos añadirle también alguna especie) y una vez este haya fundido lo sacamos del fuego y listo para dipear. ¿Verdad que os viene a la cabeza unos deliciosos nachos con guacamole y esta maravillosa salsa…?
The Spanish name for this salsa means "rooster's beak," and originally referred to a salad of jicama, peanuts, oranges, and onions. But today, whether you're in Minneapolis or Mexico City, if you ask for pico de gallo, you'll get the familiar cilantro-flecked combination of chopped tomato, onion, and fresh chiles. This tart, crisp condiment (also known as salsa Mexicana) has become so common on Mexican tables that it seems like no coincidence that its colors match those of the national flag. Besides finding firm ripe tomatoes and seeding them, the key to this salsa is adding plenty of lime juice and salt, and not skimping on the chiles. Because without a burst of acidity and heat, you're just eating chopped tomatoes.
I had to come back and check your recipe. I was feeling lazy and ordered pico de gallo from my local Safeway. It’s usually pretty good and made fresh daily, but this time it was just flat. I finally realized that there was no acid or salt, just the cut up “veggies.” I thought maybe I’d only imagined the lime juice and salt in the recipe. ;))) Guess I’ll have to doctor this up and get back to making my own.
1.El miserable último cálculo de Pedro Sánchez: cobrará la paga vitalicia por un día 2.Julia Otero se pone de los nervios con el repaso que le metió Guerra a Évole y su contundencia a la hora de hablar "del golpe de Estado" en Cataluña 3.La infanta Pilar revela el trastorno que sufre el rey don Juan Carlos : "Lo descubrimos tarde" 4.Ortega Smith deja petrificada a una podemita al avisarle lo que pasará con sus aliados golpistas y filoetarras cuando VOX irrumpa en el Parlamento 5.Guerra desenmascara a un Jordi Évole más envuelto en la estelada que nunca: "¡No suelta usted lo de Cataluña! Será que tiene que justificarse ¿eh?" 6.La foto de Berta Collado con las bragas bajadas hasta los tobillos que levanta ampollas 7.Pedro Duque deja en ridículo a Susanna Griso 8.La vergonzosa foto que enseña Girauta y que hace sudar a Anna Gabriel más de la cuenta 9.Escándalo en Cuatro, Risto Mejide expulsa a Arcadi Espada fuera de sí: hijo de puta 10.Pilar Rubio nos enseña como ir sin bragas con este infartante vestido 11.El corte del corresponsal de TVE a Irene Montero a cuenta de los hijos: "Da hasta pereza decirlo" 12.Dianariussx, la actriz que rodó con Nacho Vidal, ya tiene los resultados del VIH y abandona el porno 13.El susto que no deja vivir a gusto a la mujer de Pedro 'Colchonetti' Sánchez 14.Soberbia tribuna de Rosa Díez en la que deja a Sánchez para el arrastre: "¡Mentiroso, cínico, filibustero...!" 15.Losantos desvela como la ex de Rivera pilló el 'affaire' del de Ciudadanos con Malú

Looks gorgeous girl!! This looks like the perfect food group to me! I think I could live off salsa and chips! I love that you added roasted garlic, yum! I have never had a salsa in my life that didn’t have a kick of heat to it….everything down here is spicy and the one I love from Trader Joes I buy sometimes is also spicy, so I’m intrigued at how this tastes with no heat added! Now, I’m craving salsa.
Looks gorgeous girl!! This looks like the perfect food group to me! I think I could live off salsa and chips! I love that you added roasted garlic, yum! I have never had a salsa in my life that didn’t have a kick of heat to it….everything down here is spicy and the one I love from Trader Joes I buy sometimes is also spicy, so I’m intrigued at how this tastes with no heat added! Now, I’m craving salsa.

I like to keep a big jar of the homemade salsa in my refrigerator for up to a week. I serve the chips and salsa with quick weeknight dinners like quesadillas or tacos, and Keith loves them as a side with his sandwiches at lunch. The kids even dip veggies in the salsa for afternoon snacks. I’m not exaggerating when I say that this is truly a kitchen staple — whether we’re hosting a party or not!


It’s easy to make either a coarse salsa with just a knife and chopping board - alternatively, for a smooth salsa, whizz the ingredients in a food processor. Serve salsa with tortilla chips and dips such as guacamole or soured cream, or use it as a sauce or for topping pasta or pizza. Fruit salsas made with mango or pineapple go well with grilled fish or chicken.
TASTE AND ADJUST THE SALT & HEAT: Give it a taste test and add some more salt if it needs it. If it doesn't have enough heat, add some red pepper flakes. Start with 1/2 teaspoon and go from there. If I'm making salsa for a party, I usually divide the salsa in half and add some heat to some of it. That way I can serve a mild and hot version of the salsa.
Ha, guys, I had no idea how much you all love your pico!  Also, I had no idea that this classic of all classic recipes was somehow missing here on the blog.  Bah, this absolutely will not do for the blogger whose all-time favorite two foods are chips and salsa (<– with pico de gallo, of course, to thank as the original salsa that started it all).  I’d say it’s high time to remedy this.

And when you’re hosting a party, have you ever noticed that the chips and salsa are the first foods to disappear? No matter how many fancy side salads, dips, or canapés folks set out, the chips and salsa are inevitably the most popular. You just can’t go wrong with the simple combo, and today I’ve upped the game. With a fresh and easy homemade salsa, you’ll never go back to the jarred store-bought version again!


White onion.Whenever a recipe calls for an onion but it doesn’t specify what kind, it means to use a yellow onion. In this Pico de Gallo recipe, however, we want a white onion as specified.  White onions are shaper in flavor and boast a more pungent flavor which we want to balance the tomatoes, cilantro and lime.  You can use more or less chopped onion than called for.  My husband likes less onion than the traditional Pico de Gallo recipe, so I will often withhold some chopped onion from a portion and mix more onion in the rest. 

La historia del queso no sería lo que hoy conocemos sin los romanos. Ellos fueron los primeros productores de queso a gran escala. Incluso en las dumus romanas grandes tenían una salas separadas para hacer el queso. Los romanos envejecían el queso o lo ahumaban. Eran métodos para lograr que este alimento se pudiera comer durante más tiempo. Proteínas que siempre solían llevar entre sus provisiones los ejércitos romanos.


“From Rick Bayless, 'Authentic Mexican.' If you're looking for an authentic Mexican salsa, this is it! It's so simple too! I only use one onion and two jalapenos when I make it, but I decided I'd post the original recipe instead of altering it. The way I make it produces a medium heat. I'd imagine making it his way would produce a hot salsa. I really like it with the lime juice. I haven't made it with the vinegar yet.”

Salsa IS its own food group. Or at least it should be and while we’re at that we could decide it counts as one of your five a day, too ;). I eat salsa every day yet sadly can’t find my favourite organic brand [and there actually is only one brand and kind of organic salsa available in anyway] anymore living in the countryside now. The only ones available contain sugar and even though it’s not a ton I don’t like the fact. At least my dippers are vegetables.


I literally just made this. It’s soooo good. I did tweak the recipe a bit. I used fire roasted tomatoes along with the tomatoes with Chiles. I ended up using a whole onion and I pretty much doubled (maybe tripled) the cilantro. I also threw in a few dashes of cayenne pepper because I only had one jalepeno and it wasn’t quite enough. And I put in quite a bit of salt. But all these are personal preferances. The recipe was good as written but I made it how I personally like it. I’ll be keeping this one. I have a feeling ill be making it often, because my husband LOVES it.
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More…
Seasoned to perfection with our very own sea-salt hand-harvested in the clear blue waters of Colima, Mexico, our authentic Mexican products are made with non-GMO fruits, vegetables and herbs from our farm in Northern California. Discover our fresh salsas, homemade corn tortilla chips and so much more, made by hand, with love, and the magic of seasonal, locally grown, pure ingredients.
Cinco de Mayo is this Thursday. You haven’t even prepared for the party you’re attending. You’re supposed to make that thing you said you would. What was it, oh yeah, salsa. Rachel was counting on you. You promised. You scour the internet for a recipe. This one on D.R. Horton’s blog pops up. You think, “How could I mess this up?” It gets made. It’s delicious. You arrive at the party, salsa in hand. You realize you brought the party. Everyone loves it. You’re humbled. You reward yourself with a margarita. Okay, maybe two margaritas.

This is a fantastic and super simple recipe! I doubled the recipe because I consider salsa to be a food group in and of itself and wanted to have some for a few days. I also doubled the jalapeño as I like more kick. I must disagree with one of the other reviewers in that I found the flavor to be better the second day and still better the day after that! So much so that the next time I make it, I will make it the day before I need it so the flavors can meld overnight.

I made this recipe just as described, I drizzled olive oil on the veggies before roasting, and seeded the Tomatoes before roasting. I added two jalapeños fresh picked and one fresh picked green chili. I pulled the skins off the tomatoes when they cooled slightly… The flavor is amazing, perhaps a bit too much heat, I will chill overnight and perhaps only add one jalapeño next time. 
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