Rub one 16x12" piece of parchment with a little bit of oil. Place 1 ball of meat on one half of oiled paper, then fold other half over. Using a rolling pin or wine bottle, gently roll meat into a very thin oval between parchment (it should be about 9x6"). Transfer, with parchment, to a rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with 3 more sheets of paper and remaining meat. Chill until ready to use. 

Let sit. After you combine the Pico de Gallo ingredients in a bowl, let them sit at room temperate in order for the flavors to meld together.  If you taste it right away, I guarantee you will be disappointed. The salt draws out the flavor from the tomatoes, which we desperately want in this recipe.  Sitting also tones down the raw onion as it mingles with the lime.  Give your Pico de Gallo at least 30 minutes for the magic to happen. 

It’s easy to make either a coarse salsa with just a knife and chopping board - alternatively, for a smooth salsa, whizz the ingredients in a food processor. Serve salsa with tortilla chips and dips such as guacamole or soured cream, or use it as a sauce or for topping pasta or pizza. Fruit salsas made with mango or pineapple go well with grilled fish or chicken.
La salsa de tres quesos, tiene una textura suave y un sabor fuerte perfecto para acompañar pastas como los ñoquis de patata, raviolis caseros o cualquier pasta fresca. Los quesos que se utilicen pueden variar según su preferencia otra opciones son, queso azul o camembert. Y también podemos refrigerar la salsa para obtener una pasta de queso para untar panecillos deliciosa.
This is pretty much my exact recipe, only I stopped measuring a long time ago and I’ve never tried using canned tomatoes along with the fresh. Fresh salsa is definitely the way to go. I can’t even eat canned salsa anymore. One thing I do sometimes to add depth is to roast the tomato, garlic, and jalapeno (just throw it all on a baking sheet and let it go for about 20 minutes at 400F, turning once if I’m not feeling too lazy). This in combo with the fresh cilantro and lime juice gets rave reviews. I bet using canned tomatoes would add a similar depth!
White onion.Whenever a recipe calls for an onion but it doesn’t specify what kind, it means to use a yellow onion. In this Pico de Gallo recipe, however, we want a white onion as specified.  White onions are shaper in flavor and boast a more pungent flavor which we want to balance the tomatoes, cilantro and lime.  You can use more or less chopped onion than called for.  My husband likes less onion than the traditional Pico de Gallo recipe, so I will often withhold some chopped onion from a portion and mix more onion in the rest. 
I made this recipe just as described, I drizzled olive oil on the veggies before roasting, and seeded the Tomatoes before roasting. I added two jalapeños fresh picked and one fresh picked green chili. I pulled the skins off the tomatoes when they cooled slightly… The flavor is amazing, perhaps a bit too much heat, I will chill overnight and perhaps only add one jalapeño next time.
@Carl. My wife is Mexican and I’ve traveled there many times; particularly the state of Michoacán where she’s from. In Mexico, the sauce that you make is called a “Salsa Cruda” (Raw Sauce). It is perfectly fine to make it without frying/simmering since it’s just one of the MANY ways to make a sauce in the Mexican kitchen. I must say that adding cumin to a sauce is more typical of Tex Mex than the authentic Mexican style sauce. Also, lime is only added to something such as pico de gallo. Salsa verde is another sauce that made by cooking tomatillos, jalapeños and a couple garlic cloves in slightly boiling water for about 10 min. Once the tomatillos are cooked, you add them with a little bit of the cooking water, the chilies, garlic, a piece of white onion, cilantro and salt to a food processor. This is carefully processed due to the hot liquid. Tomatillos can be pretty acidic so a pinch of sugar can be added to counter that. I’ve been in a ranch in Michoacán where they cooked a goat over a wood fire. I saw them make the “birria” (typical Mexican sauce for roasted meats) over the same wood fire. It picked up the smoke taste and I’ll tell you, it was the best BBQ goat that I EVER had!
Hi Sara! The oil free part is hard, I haven’t found any oil free. But the unsalted and whole grain is pretty much most of the tortilla chips I’ve seen! Many have unsalted versions. For me, as long as they have very few ingredients (corn, lime, oil is the basics) I’m good. We sometimes do unsalted because we don’t eat tons of salt but there are brands with less salt use than others. Cadia makes some great ones!
By default, this isn’t a very spicy salsa.  I would probably rate it is mild, or possibly medium if you are extra sensitive.  All 3 of my kids have eaten it from the time that they were allowed to start eating chips.  There is a little bit of heat from the ROTEL tomatoes, but it is mellowed by the lime.  You can increase the spiciness of the salsa by adding extra raw jalapeño to it in the first blending step, or by using “Hot” ROTEL tomatoes rather than original.
Great dish!  I got rave reviews from my family when cooking this for a special holiday dinner. Simple!  I had 5 lbs instead of 4 lbs of robs so they needed about 10 minutes more cooking time. I used a meat thermometer and let the temp rise to 130 degrees F before removing to get to med rare. Be sure to not hit a bone when taking the temp!  One other thing, tent the meat with aluminum foil while resting the meat after the oven.  Serve on a hot plate (I just microwave mine).  :)
Homemade Salsa may seem fancy, but really it is crazy easy to make and fresh salsa is 100x times better than anything you can get in a jar! You only need a few ingredients and a couple of minutes to make anything from a personal sized batch of salsa to a batch big enough to feed a crowd.  This homemade salsa is made with canned tomatoes to make it easy, but mixed with fresh onion and cilantro so that it tastes completely fresh and delicious! Perfect for a party, as a topping on taco night, or just with a bag of chips and a movie, this salsa recipe is one I find myself making all the time!
Just made this to top with your crock pot chicken tacos, I’m in HEAVEN. This salsa is so quick to put together and the flavor is incredible. I use one can of Original Rotel and one of the mild. I always keep sliced jalapeños in a jar in my fridge so I threw in a couple of those for some heat and you’re right, tastes WAY better than a restaurant. I’m going to make another batch for this weekend!

I made this today, ate a few test bites (delicious!), took a quick Instagram shot, and then had to run to a volleyball tournament. During our down time, a few of my teammates saw the picture and begged me to run home and grab the salsa. I did, and came back with an extra bag of chips. Four girls and one and a half bags of chips and we demolished THE ENTIRE BOWL. I sent the link to at least five people who requested it and was begged to bring more to the next game. So thank you! Not only for a fantastic recipe (to which I will only add a tiny bit more heat), but for practically making me a culinary god among my friends!


Let sit. After you combine the Pico de Gallo ingredients in a bowl, let them sit at room temperate in order for the flavors to meld together.  If you taste it right away, I guarantee you will be disappointed. The salt draws out the flavor from the tomatoes, which we desperately want in this recipe.  Sitting also tones down the raw onion as it mingles with the lime.  Give your Pico de Gallo at least 30 minutes for the magic to happen.

And when you’re hosting a party, have you ever noticed that the chips and salsa are the first foods to disappear? No matter how many fancy side salads, dips, or canapés folks set out, the chips and salsa are inevitably the most popular. You just can’t go wrong with the simple combo, and today I’ve upped the game. With a fresh and easy homemade salsa, you’ll never go back to the jarred store-bought version again!


If there was ever a time to keep tortilla chips stocked in your pantry, it’s now. When tossed with lime juice, spicy chipotles, and fresh cilantro, a humble can of black beans and an ear of fresh summer corn are transformed into a bold, full-flavored salsa you’ll want to eat with everything. It’s both a crowd-pleasing dip and the base of a no-cook summer supper.
I know when I say tomatillo, some of you are already headed for the hills, but halt those steps for just a moment, and allow me to ease your nightshade veggie fears. Cause that’s all they are, ya know? A little nightshade vegetable that comes equipped with its very own little wrapper. So essentially, we’ve got ourselves a green little tomato in its very own little jacket, that goes by the name husk.
I grew up in New Mexico and Arizona, so I have a life-long connection to Mexican food. It's my favorite food. I like it spicy. It's the first kind of food I ever learned to cook. When we were very young (still in elementary school), my sister Nelda and I could prepare an entire Mexican meal of enchiladas and taquitos. It was kind of our sister specialty. Nelda made taquitos the last time we were together--a delicious comfort food from the past.
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More…
Ralla 1/2 cucharadita de nuez moscada fresca para aportar un sabor picante y dulce. Coloca la semilla de nuez moscada sobre una tabla de cortar y aplástala con el lado plano de un cuchillo de cocina. Pela la cáscara hasta dejar expuesta la nuez. Sostén un rallador plano en un ángulo de 45 grados con respecto a la tabla de cortar. Sujeta la punta de la semilla con el pulgar y el dedo índice y desliza el borde de la semilla hacia abajo por el rallador, en pasadas de 5 cm (2 pulgadas).[3]

Let me know how many times you had to slap your hand from eating it ALL! Leave a comment here, find me on Facebook or tag me on Instagram in your main comment at both @veggiesdontbite #veggiesdontbite so I don’t miss it! I respond to all your comments, I’m never ignoring you! And while I respond, I am most likely snacking on this salsa and chips. It’s addicting. But I can stop if I want. Who am I kidding, no I can’t…


This is a fantastic and super simple recipe! I doubled the recipe because I consider salsa to be a food group in and of itself and wanted to have some for a few days. I also doubled the jalapeño as I like more kick. I must disagree with one of the other reviewers in that I found the flavor to be better the second day and still better the day after that! So much so that the next time I make it, I will make it the day before I need it so the flavors can meld overnight.
Una vez tengamos todos los quesos bien fundidos, añadimos por último la nata para cocinar, subimos la potencia el fuego un poco y removemos bien para que se vaya terminando de formar la salsa cuatro quesos. En unos minutos estará la salsa bien formada, entonces podemos dejarla con la textura que queramos, añadiendo un poco más de nata si lo necesita, o incluso un poco de leche si queremos dejarla un poco más líquida. Y al acabar ya podemos servirla en caliente por encima de un buen plato de pasta por ejemplo, verás cómo queda realmente deliciosa.
Tomatoes. Choose deeply colored, firm with-with-a-little-give, ripe tomatoes for maximum flavor because this recipe centers around the tomatoes.  We want ripe for flavor but not too ripe or they will get mushy and fall apart.  Also, make sure they smell like a tomato – if they don’t smell then they will taste like cardboard.  You can use plum tomatoes, but I prefer Roma tomatoes because they have fewer seeds to scoop out.
Texas is known for its Tex Mex cuisine, and it just so happens to be one of my favorite things about my native state. If you’ve never made it down to these parts, allow me to paint you a picture: You walk into a restaurant. Nothing too fancy, but the smell immediately seduces every last one of your taste buds. You’ll take a quick glance around, and you can’t help but notice there are baskets of warm, paper-thin tortilla chips on every table, accompanied by salsa.

The first step for this recipe is to halve the tomatoes, quarter the onions, and throw them all on a sheet pan with the garlic. Toss the pan in a nice and hot oven, and let everything roast. I believe that roasting your tomatoes and onions gives the salsa so much complexity of flavor. I prefer to roast my own tomatoes rather than buy canned roasted tomatoes. It literally only takes minutes! I like to roast the tomatoes just until they start to slightly char.
This is pretty much my exact recipe, only I stopped measuring a long time ago and I’ve never tried using canned tomatoes along with the fresh. Fresh salsa is definitely the way to go. I can’t even eat canned salsa anymore. One thing I do sometimes to add depth is to roast the tomato, garlic, and jalapeno (just throw it all on a baking sheet and let it go for about 20 minutes at 400F, turning once if I’m not feeling too lazy). This in combo with the fresh cilantro and lime juice gets rave reviews. I bet using canned tomatoes would add a similar depth!
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