I made as per the recipe, apart from charring the corn on the gas while I made the patties to give the a little smoke. They were very delicious and tasty, and also quick and easy. I didn't bother with the food processor either. My problem was making the patties to big and too thin, which made them hard to transfer. I also had a wax paper collapse, and landed up having to feed some to a very happy cat! Next time I think I might try cling film, which doesn't dissolve from the meat juices.
Hi, Sommer, I was pointed to your blog by Cory Kowalski. I immediately saved your detox soup recipe AND the salsa one. I love salsa and love making it, but I can’t eat as much as I’d like to because I have kidney disease (and tomatoes aren’t good for me). I am going to try making a salsa with an extra dose of tomatilos, substituting them for some of the tomatoes. I’ll let you know how it comes out. BTW, I can’t find a ‘follow’ button on your site — except pointing to Pinterest, which I know nothing about.
Super healthy version of enchiladas since the tortillas are not fried in some oil first. Spicy as all get out even without the jalapeño and crushed red pepper, so only keep those in if you like super spicy and adding sour cream.Made with regular cheese on top 'cause it's what I had and it was fine. Nothing incredible, but different and easy to make. Side note-leftovers I scooped in a bowl with some veggie broth and added salt-popped in the microwave-turned into a delicious tortilla soup!
It’s all in the tomatoes… or more accurately, in how you prepare them! When making homemade Pico De Gallo, I prefer to core and remove the seeds from the tomatoes to keep the salsa from getting soupy. The salt will continue to draw out the natural juices from the tomatoes, so you’ll always end up with a juicier Pico De Gallo than when you started. If you were to keep the juiciest parts of the tomatoes, add lime juice and add the salt which will draw out even more juices, you’ll end up with a much more watery salsa than intended. It’ll still be delicious and enjoyable, just not quite the right consistency.
This is pretty much my exact recipe, only I stopped measuring a long time ago and I’ve never tried using canned tomatoes along with the fresh. Fresh salsa is definitely the way to go. I can’t even eat canned salsa anymore. One thing I do sometimes to add depth is to roast the tomato, garlic, and jalapeno (just throw it all on a baking sheet and let it go for about 20 minutes at 400F, turning once if I’m not feeling too lazy). This in combo with the fresh cilantro and lime juice gets rave reviews. I bet using canned tomatoes would add a similar depth!
Just made this to top with your crock pot chicken tacos, I’m in HEAVEN. This salsa is so quick to put together and the flavor is incredible. I use one can of Original Rotel and one of the mild. I always keep sliced jalapeños in a jar in my fridge so I threw in a couple of those for some heat and you’re right, tastes WAY better than a restaurant. I’m going to make another batch for this weekend!

Chips and salsa are one of my all-time favorite appetizers and snacks. If I open a bag a chips and start dipping, you can count on that bag of chips being gone by the end of the hour. I have no self control when it comes to snacking on chips and salsa! I want to eat them all and I usually do. My favorite salsa is Pico de Gallo because it is so simple and fresh! You can’t go wrong with this classic salsa.

It’s easy to make either a coarse salsa with just a knife and chopping board - alternatively, for a smooth salsa, whizz the ingredients in a food processor. Serve salsa with tortilla chips and dips such as guacamole or soured cream, or use it as a sauce or for topping pasta or pizza. Fruit salsas made with mango or pineapple go well with grilled fish or chicken.


Salsa and Queso Recipes are some of our favorite appetizers on the planet! Nothing beats a night of staying in and enjoying EASY Mexican food at home. These Salsa Recipes and Queso Recipes hit all the high notes with none of the fuss. The BEST Salsas and Cheese Dips you’ll ever come across and the only recipes you’ll ever need for game day or Cinco de Mayo!
Vamos a cocinarla a fuego medio hasta que se poche y se dore un poco, para lo que iremos removiendo de vez en cuando para que no se nos pegue. Cuando esté blandita la cebolla vamos a echar un poco de pimienta negra recién molida e iremos agregando los cuatro tipos de quesos troceados, para que se vayan fundiendo más fácilmente. Lo hacemos a fuego medio-suave, para que se vayan mezclando poco a poco y no se nos quemen. 

This homemade salsa recipe is pretty basic.  There are lots of recipes out there and lots of great recipes.  Why this one is my trusty go to recipe that I have used most of my life, is the combination of being entirely delicious, but yet still so easy to make!  With the use of some fresh ingredients and some canned you are able to trick your mouth into thinking this recipe took 10 hours of hard labor peeling tomatoes to make, when really I was able to whip up a batch of the homemade salsa in as little as 10 minutes!


Making this right this very second. Following exactly to start with..except am throwing in a couple of Thai peppers along with the 4 smallish jalapenos...which I may regret...them things are supposed to be killer hot. I will say, that it is taking significantly longer than the 10 minutes prep time for the water to simmer off (step 2), but I'm in no huge hurry....I have wine.

Simple, fresh and easy to make. A winning Mexican restaurant style salsa prepared with plum tomatoes, onion cilantro, and serrano peppers. Fresh tomatoes, not canned, star in this recipe. In Mexico, it is known as salsa roja (red sauce) or salsa de mesa (table sauce). And just like in the U.S., it is served in every restaurant before your meal with tortilla chips.
This is pretty much my exact recipe, only I stopped measuring a long time ago and I’ve never tried using canned tomatoes along with the fresh. Fresh salsa is definitely the way to go. I can’t even eat canned salsa anymore. One thing I do sometimes to add depth is to roast the tomato, garlic, and jalapeno (just throw it all on a baking sheet and let it go for about 20 minutes at 400F, turning once if I’m not feeling too lazy). This in combo with the fresh cilantro and lime juice gets rave reviews. I bet using canned tomatoes would add a similar depth!
One thing though, I have never heard of simmering it. I switch up making mine to where I add all ingredients into a food processor and process until well mixed and chopped and then serve, or I only place the tomatoes and spices in the food processor and process until well chopped and then add the finely chopped onions, jalapenos and cilantro and then mix manually until all is well mixed. This makes for a chunkier salsa, and again I serve immediately. 

Made this yesterday w/my sister & we served it to our husbands & they thought it was the best ever! We all couldn’ Stop eating it!! Also so easy to make. I added a step. If you like salsa w/o tomato skins, just slice in half & lay face down on sheet pan w/parchment paper. In oven on broil about 5 minutes, the skins wrinkle right up & pull off easily!
El queso es un ingrediente delicioso y versátil que le dará un toque genial a tus platos de vegetales, pastas y carnes. ¿Te animas a probar una solución simple y gourmet?, entonces no puedes perderte esta receta de salsa de queso que servirá para convertir cualquier preparación simple en un plato 5 estrellas con pocos ingredientes. Atento, porque en unComo.com te explicamos paso a paso cómo hacer una salsa de queso fácil y rápida.
And a very special weekend is here at The Café. A dear friend is coming in from out of town this afternoon and will be spending a few days with us. I’m super excited about her visit, and about the reason for her visit. You see, she’s coming to celebrate! A few other lovely friends are throwing a baby shower for my sweet daughter-in-law, Lindsay. There will be lots of laughter, chattering, catching up, good food and gift-opening as several generations gather to participate in a welcome party for the new baby-to-be!
Ralla 120 g (4 onzas) de queso frío. Aunque el cheddar es la opción más común, puedes utilizar cualquier tipo o combinación de quesos. Saca el queso del refrigerador. Coloca una lámina de papel encerado sobre una superficie plana. Sostén un rallador plano sobre el papel en un ángulo de 45 grados con respecto a la superficie. Coloca el queso perpendicular al rallador y, empezando desde la parte superior, presiónalo contra el rallador mientras lo mueves hacia el papel encerado. Sujeta bien el rallador con una mano y presiona firmemente el queso con la otra, arrastrándolo a lo largo del rallador.[1]
Pico De Gallo is a type of chunky fresh salsa that’s simple to throw together and is ready in just a few minutes. With just a little chopping and a few minutes of your time, you’ll have an amazingly flavorful salsa to add tons of flavor to your meals. This Pico De Gallo recipe is a great appetizer that you can serve with tortilla chips, or use it to liven up the flavor of easy dinners like taco soup recipe, homemade burrito bowls, tacos, or rice and beans.
You can easily make enough to feed a large crowd or have some extra to freeze so that you can have it on hand any time the chips and salsa craving hits or company stops by.  You can also cut the recipe in half for a personal sized little batch of salsa.  You won’t want to more than double the recipe because generally the blender or food processor won’t be big enough.
Si bien la salsa de queso es un plato tradicional de la cocina inglesa, hoy en día es la favorita de muchos alrededor del mundo. Prepara una salsa de queso cremosa para realzar el sabor de tus comidas preferidas, desde platos principales como las pastas hasta acompañamientos como las papas fritas. Con esta receta sencilla y rápida, solo necesitarás unos cuantos ingredientes y un poco de tiempo.
Salsa mexicana, also known as salsa fresca, is the reigning condiment of Mexico. It is found on the tables of both fancy restaurants and neighborhood taquerías. For some reason, in many parts of the country, it is also known as pico de gallo, or "roosters beak," a designation also given to a regional specialty of Jalisco composed of pieces of jicama, with cucumber, melon, or pineapple, all sprinkled with ground dried chiles. The commonality seems to be either the sharply cut pieces of ingredients or the sharp tastes.

Hi Kari. The tomatoes in the can are small to medium sized tomatoes, and there are plenty in there. I tested the recipe using canned, not fresh, so I can’t say for absolute certain, but my best guess would be to start with 8 small to medium tomatoes and make the salsa as directed. Taste it and use your best judgement as to if it needs more tomatoes or not.


Wow, good article. I am having a party this weekend and this will be perfect. Hey, wanted to let you know that there is another website called Wacai that you should post your article on. It has a lot of similar stuff on it. I know that you can link your website to it and it will give you a list of similar articles. It’s pretty useful, anyways thanks again!
Ralla 120 g (4 onzas) de queso frío. Aunque el cheddar es la opción más común, puedes utilizar cualquier tipo o combinación de quesos. Saca el queso del refrigerador. Coloca una lámina de papel encerado sobre una superficie plana. Sostén un rallador plano sobre el papel en un ángulo de 45 grados con respecto a la superficie. Coloca el queso perpendicular al rallador y, empezando desde la parte superior, presiónalo contra el rallador mientras lo mueves hacia el papel encerado. Sujeta bien el rallador con una mano y presiona firmemente el queso con la otra, arrastrándolo a lo largo del rallador.[1]
Texas is known for its Tex Mex cuisine, and it just so happens to be one of my favorite things about my native state. If you’ve never made it down to these parts, allow me to paint you a picture: You walk into a restaurant. Nothing too fancy, but the smell immediately seduces every last one of your taste buds. You’ll take a quick glance around, and you can’t help but notice there are baskets of warm, paper-thin tortilla chips on every table, accompanied by salsa.
First and foremost, like any salsa, this one is a crowd-pleasing party dip. But that’s just one of the many hats it wears. On nights you don’t feel like cooking (or it’s simply too hot), spoon this hearty salsa into a soft tortilla, top with a dollop of Greek yogurt and guac, and you’ve got a no-muss, no-fuss meal on your hands. Beyond that, spoon it over grilled chicken, fish, or pork chops, or make it the star of your next burrito bowl.
Looks gorgeous girl!! This looks like the perfect food group to me! I think I could live off salsa and chips! I love that you added roasted garlic, yum! I have never had a salsa in my life that didn’t have a kick of heat to it….everything down here is spicy and the one I love from Trader Joes I buy sometimes is also spicy, so I’m intrigued at how this tastes with no heat added! Now, I’m craving salsa.
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