White onion.Whenever a recipe calls for an onion but it doesn’t specify what kind, it means to use a yellow onion. In this Pico de Gallo recipe, however, we want a white onion as specified.  White onions are shaper in flavor and boast a more pungent flavor which we want to balance the tomatoes, cilantro and lime.  You can use more or less chopped onion than called for.  My husband likes less onion than the traditional Pico de Gallo recipe, so I will often withhold some chopped onion from a portion and mix more onion in the rest. 
Salsa is any one of several sauces typical of Mexican cuisine, also known as salsa fresca, hot salsa or salsa picante, particularly those used as dips. Salsa is often tomato-based, and includes ingredients such as onions, chilies, an acid and herbs. It is typically piquant, ranging from mild to extremely hot. Though many different sauce preparations are called salsa in Spanish, in English, it generally refers to raw or near-raw sauces used as dips.

Hi Mary Ann 🙂 We love cilantro, so I’ve never made this salsa without it. Most salsas actually have some cilantro in it, but if you hate the taste, you could substitute a bit of fresh parsley, or eliminate the cilantro altogether. I can’t guarantee the taste though, since my recipe uses cilantro as a big ingredient. The scoops method you mentioned sounds yummy!


I know when I say tomatillo, some of you are already headed for the hills, but halt those steps for just a moment, and allow me to ease your nightshade veggie fears. Cause that’s all they are, ya know? A little nightshade vegetable that comes equipped with its very own little wrapper. So essentially, we’ve got ourselves a green little tomato in its very own little jacket, that goes by the name husk.
The main characters in this flavorful salsa are sweet, juicy navel oranges and creamy, crowd-pleasing avocados. I zested the oranges before sectioning them adding an extra layer of citrus delight. Sweet onion, cherry tomatoes, seedless cucumbers and finely chopped jalapeño complete the cast. Of course a generous helping of chopped cilantro adds a fresh zip to any salsa, but if you’re not a fan, a shower of finely chopped fresh basil will work just as well.
Update: Because I was paranoid about the peppers, I actually could have upped them a smidge. OTOH, right now it has a gentle heat which won't burn you out after a couple bites. I did lie though. I omitted the celantro because I am one of those whose tastebuds interpret it as soap. Something tastes like it needs a little more of something, but possibly I mis-measured because the taste is wonderful..I might not whirl the tomatoes quite as much next time though. Boy, this a long comment to basically say Brava.
Use 1-2 jalapeño peppers, depending on how spicy you like your salsa. Make sure you remove the seeds and ribs before dicing the peppers. Cut the jalapeño in half lengthwise, then take a spoon and scrape out the ribs and seeds, working from the bottom to the top of the pepper. Pro tip-wear plastic gloves when working with jalapeños to prevent burning. And never rub your eyes after dicing up a jalapeño, trust me!

By default, this isn’t a very spicy salsa.  I would probably rate it is mild, or possibly medium if you are extra sensitive.  All 3 of my kids have eaten it from the time that they were allowed to start eating chips.  There is a little bit of heat from the ROTEL tomatoes, but it is mellowed by the lime.  You can increase the spiciness of the salsa by adding extra raw jalapeño to it in the first blending step, or by using “Hot” ROTEL tomatoes rather than original.


One thing though, I have never heard of simmering it. I switch up making mine to where I add all ingredients into a food processor and process until well mixed and chopped and then serve, or I only place the tomatoes and spices in the food processor and process until well chopped and then add the finely chopped onions, jalapenos and cilantro and then mix manually until all is well mixed. This makes for a chunkier salsa, and again I serve immediately.
Serve slightly chilled or at room temperature. If you serve it really cold it tastes flat. The subtle flavor of the ingredients doesn’t shine through. If you are not convinced, do a taste test. Eat a batch that is ice cold and then eat batch that is at room temperature. You will see the difference. I guarantee it. Pico de gallo is best when eaten fresh.

Salsa mexicana, also known as salsa fresca, is the reigning condiment of Mexico. It is found on the tables of both fancy restaurants and neighborhood taquerías. For some reason, in many parts of the country, it is also known as pico de gallo, or "roosters beak," a designation also given to a regional specialty of Jalisco composed of pieces of jicama, with cucumber, melon, or pineapple, all sprinkled with ground dried chiles. The commonality seems to be either the sharply cut pieces of ingredients or the sharp tastes.


I’m so glad I found this recipe… again! I made this last Christmas to satisfy the munchies between our typical heavy breakfast and heavy dinner. Everyone gobbled it up so fast, no one was hungry at dinner time. This has been at the top of the request list for our family Christmas this year, and because it’s so addictive, everyone voted to have this queso AS the evening meal, instead of the appetizer. That’s saying a lot considering we usually go all out with our Christmas dinners. This will be in our extended family meal rotation from now on. My mouth is watering just thinking about it!
Made this today with my remaining garden tomatoes, roasting the tomatoes, garlic, and onions as directed. Within just a few seconds of pulsing in the food processor, the mixture turned to complete soup. I mean, there was just no salvaging a salsa type of consistency out of it. The spices are nice and I’m going to use it to make a cream of tomato soup tomorrow, but wanted to warn others who may be really needing a salsa end product. And maybe you have some tips for ensuring this doesn’t happen?
You can easily make enough to feed a large crowd or have some extra to freeze so that you can have it on hand any time the chips and salsa craving hits or company stops by.  You can also cut the recipe in half for a personal sized little batch of salsa.  You won’t want to more than double the recipe because generally the blender or food processor won’t be big enough.
El queso es un ingrediente delicioso y versátil que le dará un toque genial a tus platos de vegetales, pastas y carnes. ¿Te animas a probar una solución simple y gourmet?, entonces no puedes perderte esta receta de salsa de queso que servirá para convertir cualquier preparación simple en un plato 5 estrellas con pocos ingredientes. Atento, porque en unComo.com te explicamos paso a paso cómo hacer una salsa de queso fácil y rápida.
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¿Cómo la elaboramos? Se hace igual que si hiciésemos una bechamel, añadimos un trozo de mantequilla a la sartén (o una cucharada de aceite), cuando haya fundido y esté caliente añadimos una o dos cucharadas de harina, removemos bien y cuando haya tostado un poco le adicionamos una taza de leche y removemos para que vaya espesando. A continuación le echamos el queso y un poco de sal (podemos añadirle también alguna especie) y una vez este haya fundido lo sacamos del fuego y listo para dipear. ¿Verdad que os viene a la cabeza unos deliciosos nachos con guacamole y esta maravillosa salsa…?
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