Ha, guys, I had no idea how much you all love your pico!  Also, I had no idea that this classic of all classic recipes was somehow missing here on the blog.  Bah, this absolutely will not do for the blogger whose all-time favorite two foods are chips and salsa (<– with pico de gallo, of course, to thank as the original salsa that started it all).  I’d say it’s high time to remedy this.

So pregnant me hears a Mexican song on the radio and immediately envision myself eating dinner at Mexico Restaurant. I decide it’s the chips and salsa I really want and since I’m headed to the grocery store anyway, I decide to try my hand at restaurant style salsa. Found your recipe while in the store, and made it asap when I got home. uncouldnt believe how easy it was! My mind was a bit blown that canned tomatoes are the base ingredient. My only critique would be to leave off the cumin or at least try it in a small bowl to make sure you like it before adding to the whole mixture.
Seasoned to perfection with our very own sea-salt hand-harvested in the clear blue waters of Colima, Mexico, our authentic Mexican products are made with non-GMO fruits, vegetables and herbs from our farm in Northern California. Discover our fresh salsas, homemade corn tortilla chips and so much more, made by hand, with love, and the magic of seasonal, locally grown, pure ingredients.
Now, this is how seriously easy this salsa is to make, folks: The avocados? They don’t even have to be chopped. Just quarter them and throw those suckers in your blender (well, skin and seed removed, of course), along with some quartered tomatillos, half of a roughly chopped onion and garlic clove, along with a few cilantro leaves for flavor, and a roughly chopped jalapeno for a little heat.
Making this right this very second. Following exactly to start with..except am throwing in a couple of Thai peppers along with the 4 smallish jalapenos...which I may regret...them things are supposed to be killer hot. I will say, that it is taking significantly longer than the 10 minutes prep time for the water to simmer off (step 2), but I'm in no huge hurry....I have wine.
Had some tomatoes from the Albuquerque grower’s market at their peak (and perhaps a tad beyond). Made the recipe as written except for an extra 3rd serrano (seeds, ribs, and all), 3 large and very fresh garlic cloves, and one chipotle en adobo. It’s cooling in the pan on the stove as I write, but I can already tell this is my new “signature” salsa. Hot diggity!
Made this today with my remaining garden tomatoes, roasting the tomatoes, garlic, and onions as directed. Within just a few seconds of pulsing in the food processor, the mixture turned to complete soup. I mean, there was just no salvaging a salsa type of consistency out of it. The spices are nice and I’m going to use it to make a cream of tomato soup tomorrow, but wanted to warn others who may be really needing a salsa end product. And maybe you have some tips for ensuring this doesn’t happen?
I made this recipe just as described, I drizzled olive oil on the veggies before roasting, and seeded the Tomatoes before roasting. I added two jalapeños fresh picked and one fresh picked green chili. I pulled the skins off the tomatoes when they cooled slightly… The flavor is amazing, perhaps a bit too much heat, I will chill overnight and perhaps only add one jalapeño next time.
Arrange the tortillas in a stack and cut into 6 equal wedges. Pour about 1-inch of oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat to 350 degrees F on a deep-fat frying thermometer. Fry just a few at a time, turning occasionally, until crisp and lightly browned, about 1 minute. Drain on paper towels; sprinkle lightly with salt, if desired. Store in an airtight container.
The Spanish name for this salsa means "rooster's beak," and originally referred to a salad of jicama, peanuts, oranges, and onions. But today, whether you're in Minneapolis or Mexico City, if you ask for pico de gallo, you'll get the familiar cilantro-flecked combination of chopped tomato, onion, and fresh chiles. This tart, crisp condiment (also known as salsa Mexicana) has become so common on Mexican tables that it seems like no coincidence that its colors match those of the national flag. Besides finding firm ripe tomatoes and seeding them, the key to this salsa is adding plenty of lime juice and salt, and not skimping on the chiles. Because without a burst of acidity and heat, you're just eating chopped tomatoes.

Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More…
This homemade salsa recipe is pretty basic.  There are lots of recipes out there and lots of great recipes.  Why this one is my trusty go to recipe that I have used most of my life, is the combination of being entirely delicious, but yet still so easy to make!  With the use of some fresh ingredients and some canned you are able to trick your mouth into thinking this recipe took 10 hours of hard labor peeling tomatoes to make, when really I was able to whip up a batch of the homemade salsa in as little as 10 minutes!
So when it comes to salsa, I think we are all in agreement that the one with avocados is pretty much always the winner, but a pair or trio of dips never hurt anybody. If you’re hosting a fajita night, check out these other easy Mexican dip recipes perfect for entertaining: crockpot taco queso, fresh salsa, and authentic guacamole would all look lovely next to a bowl of your creamy tomatillo avocado salsa! Please, enjoy!
If salsa isn’t your thing, it’s other half, guacamole, is always an option. We think it should count as its own food group, but that’s another story. If you’re wanting some guac recipes that’ll hit just as hard as Chipotle’s, scoot on over here and check out Food Network’s Alton Brown’s guacamole recipe or better yet, any of the recipes they have for the velvety goodness that is the avocado.
Hi Sara! The oil free part is hard, I haven’t found any oil free. But the unsalted and whole grain is pretty much most of the tortilla chips I’ve seen! Many have unsalted versions. For me, as long as they have very few ingredients (corn, lime, oil is the basics) I’m good. We sometimes do unsalted because we don’t eat tons of salt but there are brands with less salt use than others. Cadia makes some great ones!
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